krainaksiazek being a writer what does it take to be a writer can anyone take up the passion 20098269

- znaleziono 25 produktów w 2 sklepach

Just Fuck Me! - What Women Want Men to Know About Taking Control in the Bedroom (A Guide for Couples) - Revised Edition - 2826648305

62,03 zł

Just Fuck Me! - What Women Want Men to Know About Taking Control in the Bedroom (A Guide for Couples) - Revised Edition Kathode Ray Enterprises, LLC

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

"You're the Man... Act Like One!" Look, I know you're not a mind reader, so I'm going to be blunt... The majority of women like to be fucked. And I mean really fucked. Yes, the media has lied to you. Sure, there are some women who want to lie on their backs, look into your eyes, and gently rock back and forth, but most of us want you to channel the power of the Sun through your penis and give us a good, solid pounding. Act like you want it, for God's sake! In this book, I'm going to lay out exactly what the majority of women want and show you exactly how to give it to them. I've got a section just for you and one for your female partner, so you can feel 100% comfortable letting loose on her vagina in the way she's secretly craving. Some of the topics we'll cover... The Alpha Male - It's more than just being an ex-fratboy douchebag, who thinks he's still on the high school football team. I'll clue you in. Dirty Talk - Trust me, she wants it. If she didn't, she'd fuck a mime. Speaking of, did you know Marcel Marceau was divorced three times? Enough said. Role Playing - How she really feels about pretending to be the babysitter, a whore, and a student looking for a little "extra credit." I'll take you through her top Alpha Male fantasies...including one so controversial, I can't even mention it here. The Art of Being Assertive - Sack up and take control! What to do...and what not to do. Sexual Communication - Both you and your partner have needs and good communication, both verbal and non-verbal, is crucial when it comes to getting them on the table. I'll show you how to communicate "Alpha Male Style." You'll learn what to say...and how to say it. Now that I've got you all hyped up and extremely aware of the need to please your woman, let's make that happen! What are you waiting for? Buy the book already! Eve Kingsley is a feminist writer based in San Francisco. She teaches couples how to push the boundaries of their sexual relationships to create new levels of honesty, intimacy, and trust.

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Under the Duvet - 2212824601

36,60 zł

Under the Duvet Penguin

Powieści i opowiadania

'When people ask me what I do for a crust and I tell them that I'm a novelist, they immediately assume that my life is a non-stop carousel of limos, television appearances, hair-dos, devoted fans, stalkers and all the glitzy paraphernalia of being a public figure. It's time to set the record straight. I write alone, in a darkened bedroom, wearing my PJs, eating bananas, my laptop on a pillow in front of me ...' Her novels are adored by millions around the world

Sklep: Albertus.pl

Shadow of the Sun - 2212824581

40,80 zł

Shadow of the Sun Penguin

Literatura faktu

'Only with the greatest of simplifications, for the sake of convenience, can we say Africa. In reality, except as a geographical term, Africa doesn't exist'. Ryszard Kapuscinski has been writing about the people of Africa throughout his career. In a study that avoids the official routes, palaces and big politics, he sets out to create an account of post-colonial Africa seen at once as a whole and as a location that wholly defies generalised explanations. It is both a sustained meditation on the mosaic of peoples and practises we call 'Africa', and an impassioned attempt to come to terms with humanity itself as it struggles to escape from foreign domination, from the intoxications of freedom, from war and from politics as theft. The Beginning: Collision, Ghana 1958 More than anything, one is struck by the light. Light everywhere. Brightness everywhere. Everywhere, the sun. Just yesterday, an autumnal London was drenched in rain. The airplane drenched in rain. A cold, wind, darkness. But here, from the morning

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Just Fuck Me! - What Women Want Men to Know About Taking Con - 2838789244

71,55 zł

Just Fuck Me! - What Women Want Men to Know About Taking Con BERTRAMS

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

"You're the Man... Act Like One!" Look, I know you're not a mind reader, so I'm going to be blunt... The majority of women like to be fucked. And I mean really fucked. Yes, the media has lied to you. Sure, there are some women that want to lay on their backs, look into your eyes, and gently rock back and forth, but most of us want you to channel the power of the Sun through your penis and give us a good, solid pounding. Act like you want it, for God's sake! In this book, I'm going to lay out exactly what the majority of women want and show you exactly how to give it to them. I've got a section just for you and one for your female partner, so you can feel 100% comfortable letting loose on her vagina in the way she's secretly craving. Some of the topics we'll cover... The Alpha Male - It's more than just being an ex-fratboy douchebag, who still thinks he's on the high school football team. I'll clue you in. Dirty Talk - Trust me, she wants it. If she didn't, she'd fuck a mime. Speaking of, did you know Marcel Marceau was divorced three times? Enough said. Role Playing - How she really feels about pretending to be the babysitter, a whore, and a student looking for a little "extra credit." I'll take you through the top 11 Alpha Male fantasies...including one so controversial, I can't even mention it here. The Art of Being Assertive - Sack up and take control! What to do...and what not to do. Sexual Communication - Both you and your partner have needs and good communication, both verbal and non-verbal, is crucial when it comes to getting them on the table. I'll show you how to communicate "Alpha Male Style." You'll learn what to say...and how to say it. Now that I've got you all hyped up and extremely aware of the need to please your woman, let's go about succeeding at it. Let's get down to brass tacks. What are you waiting for? Buy the book already! Eve Kingsley is a feminist writer based in San Francisco. She teaches couples how to push the boundaries of a sexual relationship to create new levels of honesty, intimacy, and trust.

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Natasha's Dance - 2212836413

54,10 zł

Natasha's Dance Penguin

Powieści i opowiadania

Orlando Figes

Sklep: Albertus.pl

Letter from America - 2212824618

40,80 zł

Letter from America Penguin

Powieści i opowiadania

When Alistair Cooke retired in March 2004 and then died a few weeks later, he was acclaimed by many as one of the greatest broadcasters of all time. His Letters from America, which began in 1946 and continued uninterrupted every week until early 2004, kept the world in touch with what was happening in Cooke's wry, liberal and humane style. This selection, made largely by Cooke himself and supplemented by his literary executor, gives us the very best of these legendary broadcasts. Over half have never appeared in print before. It is a remarkable portrait of a continent - and a man. Fred Astaire 26 June 1987 Movie stars don't make it. Nor statesmen. Not Prime Ministers, or dictators unless they die in office. Not even a world-famous rock star, unless he's assassinated. But last Monday, none of the three national television networks hesitated about the story that would lead the evening news. On millions of little screens in this country and I don't doubt in many other countries around the world, the first shots were of an imp, a graceful wraith, a firefly in impeccable white tie and tails. And for much longer than the lead story usually runs, for a full five minutes on NBC, we were given a loving retrospective of the dead man, ending with the firm declaration by Nureyev that 'He was not just the best ballroom dancer, or tap dancer, he was simply the greatest, most imaginative, dancer of our time.' And the newsmen were right to remind us of the immortal comment of the Hollywood mogul, who, with the no-nonsense directness of an expert, reported on Fred Astaire's first film test: 'Has enormous ears, can't act, can't sing, dances a little.' That Hollywood mogul, long gone, spent his life ducking round corners, to avoid being identified as the oaf who looked in the sky and never saw the brightest star. However, that expert opinion was, as the lawyers say, controlling at the time and in Astaire's first movies, there was no thought of allowing him to act or sing. But not for long. And thanks to the invention of television, and the need to fill vast stretches of the afternoon and night with old movies, it has been possible for my daughter, for instance, to claim Fred Astaire as her favourite film star from the evidence of all the movies he made fifteen, ten, five, three years before she was born. When I got the news on Monday evening here, and realized with immediate professional satisfaction that the BBC had smartly on hand a musical obituary tribute to him I put together eight years ago, I couldn't help recalling the casual, comic way this and similar radio obituaries came about. I was in London at the end of 1979, and Richard Rodgers - one of the two or three greatest of American songwriters - had just died, I believe on New Year's Eve or the night before. Britons, by then, were getting accustomed, without pain, to making what used to be a two-day Christmas holiday into a ten-day much-needed rest. For all laborious research purposes, the BBC was shut up. And there was no retrospective programme on the life and music of Richard Rodgers in the BBC's archives. Of course, in a gramophone library that looks like an annex to the Pentagon, there were hundreds, perhaps thousands, of recordings of his songs. The SOS went out to a writer, a producer, and - I presume - a man who had the key to the gramophone library. The silent place was unlocked, and the three of them laboured through the day to put together an hour's tribute to Richard Rodgers. It was done. It was competent enough, but rushed to an impossible deadline. This hasty improvisation happened just when my own music producer and I, who had enjoyed working together for six years or so on American popular music, were wondering what we could offer next. We'd done a sketch history of jazz, through individuals. We'd gone through all the popular music of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, and were stumped for a new series, at which point I asked if we mightn't go and talk to the head of the channel, network or whatever. We went in, and the genial boss asked me what we had in mind. 'A morgue,' I said. A what? 'Where', I asked, 'is your morgue?' He was not familiar with the word, a newspaper term. 'Well,' I said, 'all newspapers have them.' 'How d'you mean?' 'If, I explained, 'Mrs Thatcher died tonight and you woke up and read a two-sentence obituary, you'd be rightly outraged. But if you saw a two-page obituary, you'd take it for granted. When d'you suppose it was written?' 'That's right,' he said thoughtfully. What I was proposing was a morgue of the Americans eminent in popular music and jazz, so they'd not get caught short again. A splendid idea, the man said; pick your stars. We made a list and were commissioned to return to America and finish all of them. Naturally, we looked at a calendar, and birthdates of Hoagy Carmichael, Earl Hines, Harold Arlen, Ethel Merman, Stephane Grappelli, Ella Fitzgerald. But then, in a spasm of panic, we thought of two giants - if the word can be used about two comparative midgets: Irving Berlin and Fred Astaire. Berlin was then 91. And Fred Astaire was just crowding 80. The boss man, to whom the idea of a morgue had been, only a few minutes before, quaint if not morbid, wondered what we were waiting for. Better get busy, at once, on Berlin and then on Astaire. I remember doing the Astaire obit, then and there, while I was still in London. Meanwhile, we'd simply pray every night that the Lord would keep Irving Berlin breathing till I could get home and get busy. I remember being picked up in a car by a charming young girl to get to the BBC and record my Astaire narration - there wasn't a moment to lose. She asked me, in the car, what the script was that I was clutching. 'It's an obituary', I said, 'of Fred Astaire.' 'Fred Astaire,' she shrieked, 'dead?' and almost swerved into a bus. 'Of course, he's not dead,' I said, 'but he's going to be one day.' She, too, was new to the institution of a morgue. I recalled that when I was a correspondent for a British paper in the United States, and when for example. Dean Acheson was appointed Secretary of State, the first cable I had from my editor said, 'Welcome Acheson obituary soonest.' How ghoulish, she said. I imagine that to two generations at least, it's assumed that Fred Astaire, this slim, pop-eyed newcomer to Hollywood who couldn't act, couldn't sing, danced a little, only made a fool of the mogul through the movies he made, with Ginger Rogers, in the mid- and late 1930s. But long before then, from the mid-1920s on, he was already an incomparable star - as a dancer - to theatre audiences both in New York and in London. Perhaps more in London than anywhere, certainly in the 1920s, with the early Gershwin hits, Funny Face and Lady Be Good, and lastly, in 1933, in Cole Porter's Gay Divorce (which was the title of the theatre show; Hollywood would not then allow so shocking a title and called the movie version, The Gay Divorcee). Of all the thousands of words that have been written this week, and will be written, there is a passage I went back to on Tuesday night which, I think, as well as anything I know, sums up Astaire's overall appeal - the appeal that takes in but transcends one's admiration for his dancing and for his inimitably intimate singing style. This was written in November 1933, by a theatre critic who had so little feel for dancing that he marvelled why London should go on about 'Mr Astaire's doing well enough what the Tiller Girls at Blackpool do superbly'. The critic, the writer, was James Agate, the irascible, dogmatic, opinionated but brilliant journalist, and I believe the best critic of acting we have had this century. He is writing his review of Gay Divorce, after declaring yet again his contempt for musical comedy as an entertainment for idiots, deploring the play's plot and the acting and hoping 'Micawberishly, for something to turn up'. 'Presently,' he wrote, 'Mr Fred Astaire obliged, and there is really no more to be said.' Except

Sklep: Albertus.pl

Wanna Cook? - 2826798276

74,25 zł

Wanna Cook? Myrmidon Books

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

"I am not in danger ...I am the danger." With those words, Breaking Bad's Walter White solidified himself as TV's greatest antihero. Wanna Cook? explores the most critically lauded series on television with analyses of the individual episodes and ongoing storylines. From details like stark settings, intricate camerawork, and jarring music to the larger themes, including the roles of violence, place, self-change, legal ethics, and fan reactions, this companion book is perfect for those diehards who have watched the Emmy Award - winning series multiple times as well as for new viewers. Wanna Cook? elucidates without spoiling, and illuminates without nit-picking. A must have for any fan's collection. Excerpt. (c) Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. From Wanna Cook's Episode Guide 1.01 Pilot/Breaking Bad Original air date: January 20, 2008 Written and directed by: Vince Gilligan "I prefer to see [chemistry] as the study of change ...that's all of life, right? It's the constant, it's the cycle. It's solution - dissolution, just over and over and over. It is growth, then decay, then - transformation! It is fascinating, really." - Walter White We meet Walter White, Jesse Pinkman, and Walt's family. Walt is poleaxed by some tragic news. With nothing to lose, Walt decides to try to make one big score, and damn the consequences. For that, however, he needs the help of Jesse Pinkman, a former student of Walt's turned loser meth cook and drug dealer. From the moment you see those khakis float down out of a perfectly blue desert sky, you know that you're watching a show like nothing else on television. The hard beauty and stillness of the American Southwest is shattered by a wildly careening RV driven by a pasty white guy with a developing paunch wearing only a gas mask and tighty-whities. What the hell? Like all pilots, this one is primarily exposition, but unlike most, the exposition is beautifully handled as the simple background of Walter's life. The use of a long flashback as the body of the episode works well, in no small part due to Bryan Cranston's brilliant performance in the opening, which gives us a Walter White so obviously, desperately out of his element that we immediately wonder how this guy wound up pantsless in the desert and apparently determined to commit suicide-by-cop. After the opening credits, the audience is taken on an intimate tour of Walt's life. Again, Cranston sells it perfectly. The viewer is presented with a middle-aged man facing the back half of his life from the perspective of an early brilliance and promise that has somehow imploded into a barely-making-ends-meet existence as a high school chemistry teacher. He has to work a lousy second job to support his pregnant wife and disabled teenage son and still can't afford to buy a hot water heater. Executive producer and series creator Vince Gilligan, along with the cast and crew (Gilligan & Co.), take the audience through this day in the life of Walt, and it's just one little humiliation after another. The only time Walt's eyes sparkle in the first half of the episode is when he is giving his introductory lecture to his chemistry class. Here Walt transcends his lower-middle-class life in an almost poetic outpouring of passion for this incredible science. Of course, even that brief joy is crushed by the arrogant insolence of the archetypal high school jackass who stays just far enough inside the line that Walt can't do a damn thing about him. So this is Walt and his life, as sad sack as you can get, with no real prospects of improvement, a brother-in-law who thinks he's a wuss, and a wife who doesn't even pay attention during birthday sex. Until everything changes. The sociologist and criminologist Lonnie Athens would likely classify Walt's cancer diagnosis as the beginning of a "dramatic self change," brought on by something so traumatic that a person's self - the very thoughts, ideas, and ways of understanding and interacting with the world - is shattered, or "fragmented," and in order to survive, the person must begin to replace that old self, those old ideas, with an entirely new worldview. (Athens and his theories are discussed much more fully in the previous essay, but since we warned you not to read that if you don't want to risk spoilage, the basic - and spoiler-free - parts are mentioned here.) Breaking Bad gives us this fragmentation beautifully. Note how from the viewer's perspective Walt is upside down as he is moved into the MRI machine, a motif smoothly repeated in the next scene with Walt's reflection in the top of the doctor's desk. Most discombobulating of all, however, is the consultation with the doctor. At first totally voiceless behind the tinnitus-like ambient soundtrack and faceless except for his chin and lips, the doctor and the news he is imparting are made unreal, out of place, and alien. As for Walt, in an exquisite touch of emotional realism, all he can focus on is the mustard stain on the doctor's lab coat. How many of us, confronted with such tragic news, have likewise found our attention focused, randomly, illogically, on some similar mundanity of life? It is from this shattered self that Walt begins to operate and things that would have been completely out of the question for pre-cancer Walt are now actual possibilities - things like finding a big score before he dies by making and selling pure crystal meth. Remember that Walt is a truly brilliant chemist, and knows full well what crystal meth is and what it does to people who use it. He may not know exactly what he's getting into, but he knows what he is doing. Enter Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul, best known previously for his role on Big Love), a skinny white-boy gangster wannabe, who under the name "Cap'n Cook" makes a living cooking and selling meth. He's also an ex-student of Walt's, and after being recognized by his former teacher during a drug bust, Walt has all the leverage he needs to coerce Jesse into helping him. Why does he need him? Because, as Walt says, "you know the business, and I know the chemistry." Symbolizing just how far beyond his old life Walt is moving, he and Jesse park their battered RV/meth lab in the desert outside of Albuquerque, far from the city and any signs of human life. All that is there is a rough dirt road and a "cow house" in the distance. The desert is a place without memory, a place outside of things, where secrets can be kept, and meth can be cooked. This is where Walt lives now. It is in this desert space that Walt becomes a killer, albeit in self defense. Ironically, the one thing that Walt views as holding the keys to the secret of life - chemistry - becomes the means to end lives. Walt, a father, teacher, and an integral part of an extended family - in other words, an agent of life and growth - has now become a meth cook, using chemical weapons to kill his enemies. Walter White has become an agent of death. The transformation is just beginning, but already Skyler (Anna Gunn, previously known for her roles on The Practice and Deadwood) is having some trouble recognizing her husband: "Walt? Is that you?" LAB NOTES Highlight: Jesse to Walt: "Man, some straight like you - giant stick up his ass all of a sudden at age what? Sixty? He's just going to break bad?" Did You Notice: This episode has the first (but not the last!) appearance of Walt's excuse that he's doing everything for his family. There's an award on the wall in Walt's house commemorating his contributions to work that was awarded the Nobel Prize back in 1985. The man's not a slouch when it comes to chemistry, so what's happened since then? At Walt's surprise birthday party, Walt is very awkward when he handles Hank's gun. Speaking of Hank (Dean Norris, whose other roles were in the TV series Medium, and the movies Total Recall, and Little Miss Sunshine), he waits until the school bus has left the neighborhood before ordering his team into the meth lab, showing what a good and careful cop he is. Maybe it's just us, but J.P. Wynne High School (where Walt teaches chemistry) seems to have the most well-equipped high school chemistry lab in the country. As Walt receives his diagnosis, the doctor's voice and all other sounds are drowned out by a kind of numbing ringing, signifying a kind of psychic overload that prevents Walt from being fully engaged with the external world. This effect will be used again several times throughout the series. Walt literally launders his money to dry it out, foreshadowing what's to come. Shooting Up: Thanks to John Toll, who served as cinematographer for the first season of Breaking Bad, the show has one of the most distinctive opening shots ever. Just watch those empty khaki pants flutter across a clear sky. Breaking Bad loves certain camera angles and this section is where we'll point out some of the shots that make the show stand out. Look at that taped non-confession Walt makes for his family when he thinks the cops are coming for him. We're used to watching recordings of characters - shows are filmed (or taped), but here, we're watching him recording himself on tape. Who's the real Walt? Title: Many pilot episodes share the name with the title of the show and Breaking Bad's pilot is no exception. Vince Gilligan, who grew up in Farmville, Virginia, has stated that "breaking bad" is a Southernism for going off the straight and narrow. When you bend a stick until it breaks, the stick usually breaks cleanly. But sometimes, sticks (and men) break bad. You can wind up in the hospital with a splinter in your eye, or you can wind up in Walter White's world. Either way, it's no kind of good. Interesting Facts: Show creator Vince Gilligan's early educational experience was at J. P. Wynne Campus School in Farmville, Virginia. He recycled the name for the high school in Breaking Bad. SPECIAL INGREDIENTS What Is Crystal Meth, Anyway? While there is some evidence that methamphetamine can be found naturally in several species of acacia plants, commercial meth making involves chemistry, not agriculture. The history of the drug dates back to 1893 when Japanese chemist Nagai Nagayoshi first synthesized the substance from ephedrine. The name "methamphetamine...

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Adult Cloze - 2826890881

128,19 zł

Adult Cloze STUDYMATES

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

This set of 30 cloze short stories is designed to provide reading and comprehension material that is appropriate for adults who have literacy skills that do not allow them to be/feel successful in their everyday lives. A number of reasons account for the large number of adults in this category. Failure in school, a broken family, illness, negative life experiences, emigration, second language English and many other causes may have contributed to their situation. Most of these adults are aware of their needs. They also often lack confidence in their reading ability and wish to improve and further develop their literacy skills.This is hard to achieve by oneself, so many adults look for support. Seeking help is a huge step.Adults who seek help may have different motivations, including getting a job or moving up the job ladder. Or it may mean gaining independence in commonplace tasks such as sitting a driving exam, writing a grocery list, reading the newspaper or doing personal banking. The main result of their efforts in literacy programs, in addition to increasing their reading skills, is the improvement of their self-image. They will be able to feel the effects in every part of their lives.How is the resource organized? The stories have been presented according to a continuum that gets gradually more difficult. They provide a variety of worthwhile reading development alternatives, using fiction and non-fiction. The contents of this resources approximately the average reading levels of 11-14 year olds. Each story is accompanied with a photo and five comprehension questions. This resource is produced in the form of black line master worksheets. Ideas for using photocopiable worksheets are suggested at the end of this introduction.What is Cloze? The cloze procedure was initially used for testing, diagnosing, classifying and identifying deficiencies in reading ability. Words are deleted from a passage and the reader is required to fill in the blanks. It is still widely used for diagnostic purposes. In recent years however the cloze procedure has also been used as an aid for reading instruction. Activities using the cloze procedure can help to develop reading and writing skills by teaching the student how to gain meaning from context clues. Cloze can also help with grammar, spelling and sequencing.How is comprehension tested? The purpose of reading is for the reader to gain information from the written word. It is possible to 'say' a word accurately but get no meaning or only a limited meaning from it. Therefore, checking the reader's understanding or comprehension of the text they have read is very important. Start by asking your student what the purpose of reading is. Many will answer with phrases such as 'learning to spell', or 'saying the words'. If necessary, explain to them that the whole point of reading is to take the meaning out of the words that the writer put there. You might like to discuss the fact that it doesn't matter too much whether they read every word correctly, or whether they sound good when reading aloud.What matters is whether they take the meaning from the text. Ask the students how they will know that they have understood the text. They will come to realise that by answering the questions accurately, they are demonstrating that they have actually read the text, ie that they have understood the meaning behind the individual words. After your initial assessment of each of your students, you may find some of them need to start by discussing what the story is about, and even, in the early stages, by reading the story once or twice to them before they try reading it. Then, having read the story as many times as they feel they need to in order to understand the meaning, the student will complete the five comprehension questions that accompany that particular story.Questions test a variety of comprehension skills and go beyond basic recall. Most of the questions are inferential, evaluative or analytical.Inferential, evaluative and analytical questions require the reader to think beyond the words or to 'read between the lines', picking subtle clues that are not immediately obvious. These questions usually require the reader to write answers based on their understanding or opinion of the story, draw conclusions, make predictions, identify main ideas and use context to guess meaning. Some of the stories require the use of reference materials such as a dictionary, maps and diagrams.Strategies - Each story can be used in many ways. Here are three: The tutor reads the story to the students with the missing words included, and then lets the students do the cloze exercise using their listening memory; The students read the story and fill in the gaps with any words they want. Their answers do not have to match the listed words, as long as they make sense in the context of the story. This should lead to an interesting discussion; and, Students read the story and then fill in the gaps, with the words provided, to complete the story so that it makes sense.After they are familiar with the story, they answer the questions you assign. Many different skills can be improved using different strategies with these stories.Discussion - discussing the topic of a story before the student reads it will give them clues; discuss related aspects of a story. Reading aloud - the way a text is read aloud, and words emphasised and grouped in particular ways, will indicate a level of understanding. Word identification - some words will be known by sight and reinforced in the text. Word attack (decoding) - decoding skills must be taught so that students can apply them when reading independently. Silent reading - silent reading is a highly developed skill which takes time to master. Help them gain confidence.Repetition - students begin to recall words when reading text a second or third time. Developing skilled reading has a lot to do with reading 'mileage' - just doing the practice.Photos - clues can also be gained from the photo on each page. This isn't cheating - it's something we all do to assist our understanding of text. Context - adults have a wealth of experience which they can use. To read effectively, readers need to learn to take risks without the fear of failure. Teach students how to guess what a word means using the surrounding clues. Use the word in another context to reinforce the learning. Analysis - encourage students to read analytically, thinking beyond the written information, and relating what they read to their own experiences. Some questions can have more than one right answer, as long as the reasoning is logical.Revision - the stories can be effectively used for revision. Keep stories in a folder so they can reread their favourites regularly. Enrichment - students may find particular stories more appealing than others. When they really enjoy a story, find related stories from other sources to read. These will more likely hold their interest and speed up their learning.Photocopiable resources - The following is a list of some of the ways in which photocopiable teaching resources (black line masters or BLM) may be used in an instructional environment to ensure variety of presentation and moderation in photocopying costs. Copy the resource to A4 paper at a rate of one sheet per student. Students write on the sheet. Copy the resource to A4 paper at a rate of one sheet per group. Students work together to complete one sheet between them. Use the resource as a tutor guide only, running the exploration as a tutor-guided activity. Copy the resource to the whiteboard. Copy the resource to an OHP transparency and project it on the wall. Keep the OHP with the resource book so that tutors choosing the same resource do not have to copy the page again.Some resources lend themselves to a discussion activity, where half the class does one activity and the other half does another.They pair up to 'mark' each other's work. Copy the resource to A3 paper using the enlarging function of your copier. Use this page as a wall chart. Copy the resource 2 per A4 sheet (depending on legibility). Guillotine. Students paste the small sheets into their workbooks then write their answers or complete the activities on the adjoining pages.Copy all the pages required for the unit to A3 to form a booklet. Pages can either be retained at A4 presentation size or reduced to A5. By choosing say 8 pages to present in this way during the unit, students can each receive a small booklet at the start of the unit comprised of just one or two sheets of A3 paper folded and stapled appropriately. Present a copy of the resource to students the day before the exercise. Explain that they will be required to present this part of the unit in their own way the following day. Use peer teaching by presenting the resource to one student to teach the ideas to others.

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Infinite Monkey Cage: Series 4 - 2834154627

31,73 zł

Infinite Monkey Cage: Series 4 BBC Audiobooks Ltd

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

This title is presented on 2CDs. Physicist Brian Cox and comedian Robin Ince return for the fourth series of the Sony Radio Academy Gold Award-winning BBC Radio 4 show in which they take a witty, irreverent and unashamedly rational look at the world according to science. In the first episode, "What Don't We Know?", the Infinite Monkeys will be asking what don't we know, do we know what we don't know, does science know what it doesn't know, and are there some things that science will never be able to know? Joining them on stage are the comedian Paul Foot, biologist Professor Steve Jones and cosmologist and science writer Marcus Chown. In Episode 2, "6 Degrees", Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by special guest Stephen Fry and science writer Simon Singh to find out whether we really are only 6 degrees of separation from anyone else. In Episode 3, "So You Want to Be an Astronaut?", Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined by comedian Helen Keen and space medicine expert Dr Kevin Fong to discuss the future of human space travel. In the fourth episode of this series, "Is Cosmology Really a Science?" , Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined on stage by "V for Vendetta" author and legendary comic book writer Alan Moore, cosmologist Ed Copeland, and science broadcaster Dallas Campbell to ask whether cosmology is really a science. Episode 5 is a special edition, recorded at the Glastonbury Festival, in which Robin Ince and Brian Cox aim to prove that science really is the new rock n' roll. They are joined on stage by musicians Billy Bragg and Graham Coxon, comedian Shappi Khorsandi, and scientist Professor Tony Ryan. In the final episode of the series, "Science v The Supernatural: Does Science Kill the Magic?", Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined on stage by actor and magician Andy Nyman, psychologist Richard Wiseman and neuroscientist Bruce Hood as they take on the paranormal. This title is winner of a Sony Radio Academy Gold Award for Best Speech Programme. "A brilliant way of being both innovative and instructive, bringing humour to what some will see as a dull subject. It's listenable, educational and brings a whole new audience to both the subject and the station". ("The Judges").

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Forever War - 2212845114

37,50 zł

Forever War Vintage Books

Powieści i opowiadania

Contrary to much that has been and is being written on the Anglo-American (plus coalition) wars and occupation in Iraq and Afghanistan, Dexter Filkins' book "The Forever War" is not a political book. That is to say, it deals with political issues of necessity, but it does not make a political argument of any particular kind. Rather, Filkins, a war correspondent for the New York Times, has operated as a tabula rasa on which the war events he witnessed could make their impression, without any preconceived notions or arguments getting in the way. This has the definite advantage that Filkins does not add to the pile of increasingly irrelevant argumentation about the possibilities of ill-defined "success" in these regions, but rather lets the reader vicariously experience the reality of living and fighting in these war-torn countries. In a way, this is nonetheless a political argument on its own, as despite Filkins' good relations with the American soldiers he joined as an 'embedded reporter', it is clear from his experiences that not much is being achieved by way of either 'nation-building' or establishing lasting security in these countries, indeed the least any occupier with pretentions of superiority could do. The fact that Filkins does not explicitly make this argument, or any argument, is fairly pleasant in that it lets the experiences speak for themselves in a more subtle manner than newspaper moralizing often permits. However, this book also has clear downsides. Filkins does not give much, if any, background information on the combatant parties involved or even of the countries, other than the absolutely necessary. What's more, his war reporting uses a heavily colloquial style that is very grating initially and makes him seem to 'try too hard' to come off as cool, detached and rough - perhaps this is something that he took over from the Marines he was stationed with, but it does not in my view help the book's readability any. One does get used to it and over the course of the book he gets more serious, but the first few chapters are rather annoying. The main value of the book is probably the service it does to humanizing the people involved, both of the occupying armies and their opponents. They say that truth is the first casualty of war, but surely the greatest casualty of war is a sense of shared humanity. Indeed it is hard to get any group to fight any other without in some way dehumanizing them first, and all the political argumentation of the world does not suffice of itself to repair a warped view of this kind once it is dominant. What can do so is a vivid description of real people and their human traits and follies. It used to be that literature played this role, but the authority and impact of the writer has diminished; now perhaps journalists can take this over to some extent. Some people combine this with the political argumentation for the greatest possible effect, like Robert Fisk does for example, but even if one leaves out the politics, the experience of humanization alone is very valuable. This is what Filkins' book contributes.

Sklep: Albertus.pl

Stages of Schizophrenia, The (Part 3) - 2826875698

86,15 zł

Stages of Schizophrenia, The (Part 3) Chipmunka Publishing

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

By Mark Ellerby ISBN: 9781847470997 Published: 2006 Pages: 136 Key Themes: schizophrenia, recovery, self-help Description This, Mark Ellerby's third book on the subject of schizophrenia, deals further with his experiences of and thoughts on living with schizophrenia. Mark is an entertaining and informative writer and this is a worthy addition to his previous works. About the Author My biographical history is very much dominated by schizophrenia which began at age 21. I had just graduated from university and starting a PhD. course in political philosophy. I had to give up my PhD. after a five year struggle with the illness due to a lack of information to hand about what hearing voices actually is. Book Extract I have often wondered if my schizophrenia was caused by acute depression together with a nervous breakdown. There was a kind of transitional stage from the social isolation that comes with a serious depression and increasing vulnerability to hearing voices. I do not know nor do I think anyone knows if there is a link but the context of one naturally leads to exposure to the other. Starting to be alone for the first time in my life magnified those first auditory hallucinations. I think there was another kind of susceptibility to the schizophrenia: with the depression I felt I had no fight left in me. But with schizophrenia that is exactly what you need. You have to fight the influence of the voices (which in my case where very insipid). I felt when I had depression that I was so pliable that I would have gone along with any suggestion. Fortunately the depression past, unfortunately the schizophrenia gradually became what I can only describe as more invasive. Being a postgraduate did not help my situation. Research is a solipsistic activity at best. All you have to do is meet with your supervisor once a week and tell him your ideas. That leaves the rest of time for being in the library. Fortunately, I had most of it done by the end of the first year, aided by the fact that I was self funded the year before that. All I really had to do was write it all up. But this was the hard part - concentrating while you were hearing voices. Gradually they began to take over my life. I did not know who to turn to or what to say about them. I had no medical problems prior to the onset of schizophrenia and was not familiar enough with any medical persons who might have noticed I was ill. I do not know if I looked ill but I certainly felt it. All illnesses are psycho-somatic. I was not on terms of familiarity with many other students, except perhaps a few fellow postgraduates. I think none of them knew what was happening either and probably put my withdrawal down to work stresses.

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America from the Air - 2826843748

128,99 zł

America from the Air JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY PRESS

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

"I am no helmeted, begoggled hero of the skies; picture me bookish, bespectacled, unable to hold even a teacup without rattling it. As a pilot, I am merely an amateur, and I know it...I shouldn't be talking. But I can't help talking. For you take the air: the thin, substanceless air that can be made to bear a man; you take America; and you take an airplane, which of all the works of man is the nearest to a living being-you take those things and mix them up, and they will act as a drug which will knock all proper reticence right out of you. And so, here I go talking..."-from America from the Air In 1927, Charles Lindbergh made his historic solo flight across the Atlantic; Amelia Earhart became the first woman to do so in 1932. And so was born the golden age of flying. Aviators became the era's new heroes and the airplane its icon. In early 1930s Chicago, a German-born graduate student became fascinated by the airplane and its usefulness as a great geographic and sociological tool. Wolfgang Langewiesche sold his car and used his meager salary to pay for flying lessons at 25 cents a minute. With the same passion America had taken to the road a decade earlier, Langewiesche took to the air. He eagerly inhaled the landscape and breathed observations about the country, writing a series of books that describe the heady excitement and freedom of flight and the stunning views of his adopted country from an entirely new vantage point-the sky. This new edited volume revives the writings from two of his now out-of-print books. America from the Air draws from Langewiesche's classic account of his early experiences as a pilot, I'll Take the High Road (first published in 1939 and praised by the New York Times as "a stirring and revealing story, told with sensitiveness and lucidity and with the warmth of a modest personal charm"), and selections from his 1951 memoir, A Flier's World, to create a distinctive book that provides a pioneering look at the American landscape as seen from the cockpit of a light plane. Langewiesche's photographs from his cross-country flights circa 1939 evoke the era. Wolfgang Langewiesche is revered among pilots for his 1944 flying primer, Stick and Rudder, currently in its seventieth printing. Considered the bible of aviation, it tells us the "how" of flying; America from the Air tells us the "why." Here his descriptions of the country offer unique perspectives on New England, the Midwest, and the Atlantic Coast from Virginia to Key West, at a time before the country was paved over by multilane expressways, suburban tract housing, and strip malls. His bird's-eye view of America takes in small farms, deserted seashores, busy railway lines, and cities in which skyscrapers were still engineering marvels. With the keen eye of a surveyor and an uncommon talent for conveying the physical sensation of flying, he describes landscape in all its beauty and detail as it rolls out beneath him, unveiling its mysteries. Langewiesche is revealed here as an infectiously enthusiastic aviator and an unrivaled observer of the American landscape. In a new foreword, Langewiesche's son, writer William Langewiesche, describes his father's love of the view from above. Hokanson and Kratz's introduction and biography update the reader, incorporating stories gleaned from recent interviews with the author.

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Hope in the Urban Schools - 2827052932

76,47 zł

Hope in the Urban Schools Strategic Book Publishing

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Hope in the Urban Schools: Love Stories explores the school life of urban students. With the current political backdrop in public education, including the realities of No Child Left Behind, illegal immigration, poverty and racism, readers will meet real students craving the access their suburban counterparts so often take for granted. From seemingly hopeless to believing in success, these true stories show the challenges students bring to public schools, and provide evidence of how schools can nurture the love and hope needed to develop bright futures. "I am grateful to Cara Riggs for sharing her experiences and the real life stories of students she has served ... In these love stories, you will discover the hope being provided to students in the urban schools." - John Mackiel, Superintendent, Omaha Public Schools "Finally! An honest and raw look into the power of adult-to-student relationships in providing hope for our kids in challenging situations ... what a breath of fresh air! Principal Cara Riggs has provided a loving insight into the complexities of creating public school atmospheres where hope can indeed conquer hopelessness ... A 'must read' for anyone who really cares about the education of our kids and what's working." - Wes Hall, Author, Teacher Trainer, National Keynote Speaker "Her story is a triumphant example of what can happen when a principal refuses to give up on the 'unteachable' kids." - Erin Gruwell, Freedom Writer's Foundation "At a time when our country seems to be abandoning our public schools, this book is a 'must read.' " - Susie Buffett, Sherwood Foundation Cara Churchich-Riggs has been an educator in the Omaha Pubic Schools for nearly three decades. She is currently a high school principal. Publisher's website: http://sbpra.com/CaraChurchich-Riggs

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Bakuman - 2826653660

45,85 zł

Bakuman Viz Media

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Average student Moritaka Mashiro enjoys drawing for fun. When his classmate and aspiring writer Akito Takagi discovers his talent, he begs Moritaka to team up with him as a manga-creating duo. But what exactly does it take to make it in the manga-publishing world? Moritaka is hesitant to seriously consider Akito's proposal because he knows how difficult reaching the professional level can be. Still, encouragement from persistent Akito and motivation from his crush push Moritaka to test his limits! Moritaka and Akito face the prospect of their series being canceled in Shonen Jump due to dropping popularity. Can the duo avoid the axe and keep fighting? And when Akito starts becoming friendly with fellow manga creator Ko Aoki, how will it affect his long-term relationship with Kaya?

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Sensible Guide to Forex - 2841424889

293,83 zł

Sensible Guide to Forex Wiley

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

FXstreet.Com's 2013 Best Book Award! The Sensible Guide to Forex: Safer, Smarter Ways to Survive and Prosper from the Start is written for the risk averse, mainstream retail investor or trader seeking a more effective way to tap forex markets to improve returns and hedge currency risk. As the most widely held currencies are being devalued, they're taking your portfolio down with them--unless you're prepared. For traders, the book focuses on reducing the high risk, complexity, and time demands normally associated with forex trading. For long-term investors, it concentrates on how to hedge currency risk by diversifying portfolios into the strongest currencies for lower risk and higher capital gains and income. The usual forex materials don't provide practical answers for most retail traders or longer term investors. Virtually all forex trading materials focus on time-consuming, high-leverage, high-risk methods at which most traders fail. Materials about long-term investing in foreign assets rarely take into account the prospects of the related currency. A falling currency can turn an otherwise good investment into a bad one. Throughout the book, the emphasis is on planning and executing only low risk, high potential yield trades or investments and avoiding serious losses at all costs. Packed with richly illustrated examples every step of the way and including additional appendices and references to online resources, the book is the ultimate guide to forex for retail traders and investors seeking to tap forex markets for better currency diversification and income. Provides traders with safer, smarter, less complex and time-consuming ways to trade forex with higher odds of success. These include the use of such increasingly popular new instruments like forex binary options and social trading accounts that mimic expert traders. Shows investors how to identify the currencies most likely to hold or increase their value, and provides a wealth of ideas about how to apply that knowledge to a long-term, low-maintenance portfolio for both income and capital appreciation. Helps anyone seeking an asset class with low correlation to other markets by explaining how the very nature of forex markets means that regardless of market conditions there's always a playable trend somewhere, regardless of what other asset markets are doing, and how to find and exploit it for a short-term trade or a long-term investment in a currency pair, stock, bond, or other asset The Sensible Guide to Forex is only book that teaches mainstream risk averse investors and traders how to build a portfolio that's diversified by currency exposure as well as by asset class and sector, via a variety of safer, simpler methods to suit different needs, risk tolerances, and levels of expertise. Written by Cliff Wachtel, a 30+ year financial market writer, advisor, and analyst, The Sensible Guide to Forex offers practical solutions to the above dilemmas faced by every serious, prudent investor. A must own for any informed investor-but don't take out word for it - see advanced reviews at: http://thesensibleguidetoforex.com/review/

Sklep: Libristo.pl

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