krainaksiazek being a writer what does it take to be a writer can anyone take up the passion 20098269

- znaleziono 26 produktów w 2 sklepach

Under the Duvet - 2212824601

36,60 zł

Under the Duvet Penguin

Powieści i opowiadania

'When people ask me what I do for a crust and I tell them that I'm a novelist, they immediately assume that my life is a non-stop carousel of limos, television appearances, hair-dos, devoted fans, stalkers and all the glitzy paraphernalia of being a public figure. It's time to set the record straight. I write alone, in a darkened bedroom, wearing my PJs, eating bananas, my laptop on a pillow in front of me ...' Her novels are adored by millions around the world

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Shadow of the Sun - 2212824581

40,80 zł

Shadow of the Sun Penguin

Literatura faktu

'Only with the greatest of simplifications, for the sake of convenience, can we say Africa. In reality, except as a geographical term, Africa doesn't exist'. Ryszard Kapuscinski has been writing about the people of Africa throughout his career. In a study that avoids the official routes, palaces and big politics, he sets out to create an account of post-colonial Africa seen at once as a whole and as a location that wholly defies generalised explanations. It is both a sustained meditation on the mosaic of peoples and practises we call 'Africa', and an impassioned attempt to come to terms with humanity itself as it struggles to escape from foreign domination, from the intoxications of freedom, from war and from politics as theft. The Beginning: Collision, Ghana 1958 More than anything, one is struck by the light. Light everywhere. Brightness everywhere. Everywhere, the sun. Just yesterday, an autumnal London was drenched in rain. The airplane drenched in rain. A cold, wind, darkness. But here, from the morning

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Just Fuck Me! - What Women Want Men to Know About Taking Con - 2838789244

70,09 zł

Just Fuck Me! - What Women Want Men to Know About Taking Con BERTRAMS

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

"You're the Man... Act Like One!" Look, I know you're not a mind reader, so I'm going to be blunt... The majority of women like to be fucked. And I mean really fucked. Yes, the media has lied to you. Sure, there are some women that want to lay on their backs, look into your eyes, and gently rock back and forth, but most of us want you to channel the power of the Sun through your penis and give us a good, solid pounding. Act like you want it, for God's sake! In this book, I'm going to lay out exactly what the majority of women want and show you exactly how to give it to them. I've got a section just for you and one for your female partner, so you can feel 100% comfortable letting loose on her vagina in the way she's secretly craving. Some of the topics we'll cover... The Alpha Male - It's more than just being an ex-fratboy douchebag, who still thinks he's on the high school football team. I'll clue you in. Dirty Talk - Trust me, she wants it. If she didn't, she'd fuck a mime. Speaking of, did you know Marcel Marceau was divorced three times? Enough said. Role Playing - How she really feels about pretending to be the babysitter, a whore, and a student looking for a little "extra credit." I'll take you through the top 11 Alpha Male fantasies...including one so controversial, I can't even mention it here. The Art of Being Assertive - Sack up and take control! What to do...and what not to do. Sexual Communication - Both you and your partner have needs and good communication, both verbal and non-verbal, is crucial when it comes to getting them on the table. I'll show you how to communicate "Alpha Male Style." You'll learn what to say...and how to say it. Now that I've got you all hyped up and extremely aware of the need to please your woman, let's go about succeeding at it. Let's get down to brass tacks. What are you waiting for? Buy the book already! Eve Kingsley is a feminist writer based in San Francisco. She teaches couples how to push the boundaries of a sexual relationship to create new levels of honesty, intimacy, and trust.

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Natasha's Dance - 2212836413

54,10 zł

Natasha's Dance Penguin

Powieści i opowiadania

Orlando Figes

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Insider's Guide to Technical Writing - 2857570934

117,08 zł

Insider's Guide to Technical Writing XML Press

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Every complex product needs to be explained to its users, and technical writers, also known as technical communicators, are the ones who do that job. A growing field, technical writing requires multiple skills, including an understanding of technology, writing ability, and great people skills. Whether you're thinking of becoming a technical writer, just starting out, or you've been working for a while and feel the need to take your skills to the next level, The Insider's Guide to Technical Writing can help you be a successful technical writer and build a satisfying career. Inside the Book Is This Job for Me? What does it take to be a technical writer? Building the Foundation: What skills and tools do you need to get started? The Best Laid Plans: How do you create a schedule that won't make you go crazy? How do you manage different development processes, including Agile methodologies? On the Job: What does it take to walk into a job and be productive right away? The Tech Writer's Toolkit: How do you create style guides, indexes, templates and layouts? How do you manage localization and translation and all the other non-writing parts of the job? I Love My Job: How do you handle the ups and downs of being a technical writer? Appendixes: References to websites, books, and other resources to keep you learning. The Insider's Guide to Technical Writing builds on Van Laan's previous book, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Technical Writing, but is significantly rewritten, extended, and brought up to date. About the Author Krista Van Laan has worked in, managed, and built from the ground up multi-level Technical Publications and User Experience departments in telecommunications, consumer software and hardware, enterprise software and services, and Internet companies, both in the United States and internationally. She is co-author of The Complete Idiot's Guide to Technical Writing. Krista is currently the Director of User Experience at a Silicon Valley enterprise.

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Letter from America - 2212824618

40,80 zł

Letter from America Penguin

Powieści i opowiadania

When Alistair Cooke retired in March 2004 and then died a few weeks later, he was acclaimed by many as one of the greatest broadcasters of all time. His Letters from America, which began in 1946 and continued uninterrupted every week until early 2004, kept the world in touch with what was happening in Cooke's wry, liberal and humane style. This selection, made largely by Cooke himself and supplemented by his literary executor, gives us the very best of these legendary broadcasts. Over half have never appeared in print before. It is a remarkable portrait of a continent - and a man. Fred Astaire 26 June 1987 Movie stars don't make it. Nor statesmen. Not Prime Ministers, or dictators unless they die in office. Not even a world-famous rock star, unless he's assassinated. But last Monday, none of the three national television networks hesitated about the story that would lead the evening news. On millions of little screens in this country and I don't doubt in many other countries around the world, the first shots were of an imp, a graceful wraith, a firefly in impeccable white tie and tails. And for much longer than the lead story usually runs, for a full five minutes on NBC, we were given a loving retrospective of the dead man, ending with the firm declaration by Nureyev that 'He was not just the best ballroom dancer, or tap dancer, he was simply the greatest, most imaginative, dancer of our time.' And the newsmen were right to remind us of the immortal comment of the Hollywood mogul, who, with the no-nonsense directness of an expert, reported on Fred Astaire's first film test: 'Has enormous ears, can't act, can't sing, dances a little.' That Hollywood mogul, long gone, spent his life ducking round corners, to avoid being identified as the oaf who looked in the sky and never saw the brightest star. However, that expert opinion was, as the lawyers say, controlling at the time and in Astaire's first movies, there was no thought of allowing him to act or sing. But not for long. And thanks to the invention of television, and the need to fill vast stretches of the afternoon and night with old movies, it has been possible for my daughter, for instance, to claim Fred Astaire as her favourite film star from the evidence of all the movies he made fifteen, ten, five, three years before she was born. When I got the news on Monday evening here, and realized with immediate professional satisfaction that the BBC had smartly on hand a musical obituary tribute to him I put together eight years ago, I couldn't help recalling the casual, comic way this and similar radio obituaries came about. I was in London at the end of 1979, and Richard Rodgers - one of the two or three greatest of American songwriters - had just died, I believe on New Year's Eve or the night before. Britons, by then, were getting accustomed, without pain, to making what used to be a two-day Christmas holiday into a ten-day much-needed rest. For all laborious research purposes, the BBC was shut up. And there was no retrospective programme on the life and music of Richard Rodgers in the BBC's archives. Of course, in a gramophone library that looks like an annex to the Pentagon, there were hundreds, perhaps thousands, of recordings of his songs. The SOS went out to a writer, a producer, and - I presume - a man who had the key to the gramophone library. The silent place was unlocked, and the three of them laboured through the day to put together an hour's tribute to Richard Rodgers. It was done. It was competent enough, but rushed to an impossible deadline. This hasty improvisation happened just when my own music producer and I, who had enjoyed working together for six years or so on American popular music, were wondering what we could offer next. We'd done a sketch history of jazz, through individuals. We'd gone through all the popular music of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, and were stumped for a new series, at which point I asked if we mightn't go and talk to the head of the channel, network or whatever. We went in, and the genial boss asked me what we had in mind. 'A morgue,' I said. A what? 'Where', I asked, 'is your morgue?' He was not familiar with the word, a newspaper term. 'Well,' I said, 'all newspapers have them.' 'How d'you mean?' 'If, I explained, 'Mrs Thatcher died tonight and you woke up and read a two-sentence obituary, you'd be rightly outraged. But if you saw a two-page obituary, you'd take it for granted. When d'you suppose it was written?' 'That's right,' he said thoughtfully. What I was proposing was a morgue of the Americans eminent in popular music and jazz, so they'd not get caught short again. A splendid idea, the man said; pick your stars. We made a list and were commissioned to return to America and finish all of them. Naturally, we looked at a calendar, and birthdates of Hoagy Carmichael, Earl Hines, Harold Arlen, Ethel Merman, Stephane Grappelli, Ella Fitzgerald. But then, in a spasm of panic, we thought of two giants - if the word can be used about two comparative midgets: Irving Berlin and Fred Astaire. Berlin was then 91. And Fred Astaire was just crowding 80. The boss man, to whom the idea of a morgue had been, only a few minutes before, quaint if not morbid, wondered what we were waiting for. Better get busy, at once, on Berlin and then on Astaire. I remember doing the Astaire obit, then and there, while I was still in London. Meanwhile, we'd simply pray every night that the Lord would keep Irving Berlin breathing till I could get home and get busy. I remember being picked up in a car by a charming young girl to get to the BBC and record my Astaire narration - there wasn't a moment to lose. She asked me, in the car, what the script was that I was clutching. 'It's an obituary', I said, 'of Fred Astaire.' 'Fred Astaire,' she shrieked, 'dead?' and almost swerved into a bus. 'Of course, he's not dead,' I said, 'but he's going to be one day.' She, too, was new to the institution of a morgue. I recalled that when I was a correspondent for a British paper in the United States, and when for example. Dean Acheson was appointed Secretary of State, the first cable I had from my editor said, 'Welcome Acheson obituary soonest.' How ghoulish, she said. I imagine that to two generations at least, it's assumed that Fred Astaire, this slim, pop-eyed newcomer to Hollywood who couldn't act, couldn't sing, danced a little, only made a fool of the mogul through the movies he made, with Ginger Rogers, in the mid- and late 1930s. But long before then, from the mid-1920s on, he was already an incomparable star - as a dancer - to theatre audiences both in New York and in London. Perhaps more in London than anywhere, certainly in the 1920s, with the early Gershwin hits, Funny Face and Lady Be Good, and lastly, in 1933, in Cole Porter's Gay Divorce (which was the title of the theatre show; Hollywood would not then allow so shocking a title and called the movie version, The Gay Divorcee). Of all the thousands of words that have been written this week, and will be written, there is a passage I went back to on Tuesday night which, I think, as well as anything I know, sums up Astaire's overall appeal - the appeal that takes in but transcends one's admiration for his dancing and for his inimitably intimate singing style. This was written in November 1933, by a theatre critic who had so little feel for dancing that he marvelled why London should go on about 'Mr Astaire's doing well enough what the Tiller Girls at Blackpool do superbly'. The critic, the writer, was James Agate, the irascible, dogmatic, opinionated but brilliant journalist, and I believe the best critic of acting we have had this century. He is writing his review of Gay Divorce, after declaring yet again his contempt for musical comedy as an entertainment for idiots, deploring the play's plot and the acting and hoping 'Micawberishly, for something to turn up'. 'Presently,' he wrote, 'Mr Fred Astaire obliged, and there is really no more to be said.' Except

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Wanna Cook? - 2826798276

69,10 zł

Wanna Cook? Myrmidon Books

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

"I am not in danger ...I am the danger." With those words, Breaking Bad's Walter White solidified himself as TV's greatest antihero. Wanna Cook? explores the most critically lauded series on television with analyses of the individual episodes and ongoing storylines. From details like stark settings, intricate camerawork, and jarring music to the larger themes, including the roles of violence, place, self-change, legal ethics, and fan reactions, this companion book is perfect for those diehards who have watched the Emmy Award - winning series multiple times as well as for new viewers. Wanna Cook? elucidates without spoiling, and illuminates without nit-picking. A must have for any fan's collection. Excerpt. (c) Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. From Wanna Cook's Episode Guide 1.01 Pilot/Breaking Bad Original air date: January 20, 2008 Written and directed by: Vince Gilligan "I prefer to see [chemistry] as the study of change ...that's all of life, right? It's the constant, it's the cycle. It's solution - dissolution, just over and over and over. It is growth, then decay, then - transformation! It is fascinating, really." - Walter White We meet Walter White, Jesse Pinkman, and Walt's family. Walt is poleaxed by some tragic news. With nothing to lose, Walt decides to try to make one big score, and damn the consequences. For that, however, he needs the help of Jesse Pinkman, a former student of Walt's turned loser meth cook and drug dealer. From the moment you see those khakis float down out of a perfectly blue desert sky, you know that you're watching a show like nothing else on television. The hard beauty and stillness of the American Southwest is shattered by a wildly careening RV driven by a pasty white guy with a developing paunch wearing only a gas mask and tighty-whities. What the hell? Like all pilots, this one is primarily exposition, but unlike most, the exposition is beautifully handled as the simple background of Walter's life. The use of a long flashback as the body of the episode works well, in no small part due to Bryan Cranston's brilliant performance in the opening, which gives us a Walter White so obviously, desperately out of his element that we immediately wonder how this guy wound up pantsless in the desert and apparently determined to commit suicide-by-cop. After the opening credits, the audience is taken on an intimate tour of Walt's life. Again, Cranston sells it perfectly. The viewer is presented with a middle-aged man facing the back half of his life from the perspective of an early brilliance and promise that has somehow imploded into a barely-making-ends-meet existence as a high school chemistry teacher. He has to work a lousy second job to support his pregnant wife and disabled teenage son and still can't afford to buy a hot water heater. Executive producer and series creator Vince Gilligan, along with the cast and crew (Gilligan & Co.), take the audience through this day in the life of Walt, and it's just one little humiliation after another. The only time Walt's eyes sparkle in the first half of the episode is when he is giving his introductory lecture to his chemistry class. Here Walt transcends his lower-middle-class life in an almost poetic outpouring of passion for this incredible science. Of course, even that brief joy is crushed by the arrogant insolence of the archetypal high school jackass who stays just far enough inside the line that Walt can't do a damn thing about him. So this is Walt and his life, as sad sack as you can get, with no real prospects of improvement, a brother-in-law who thinks he's a wuss, and a wife who doesn't even pay attention during birthday sex. Until everything changes. The sociologist and criminologist Lonnie Athens would likely classify Walt's cancer diagnosis as the beginning of a "dramatic self change," brought on by something so traumatic that a person's self - the very thoughts, ideas, and ways of understanding and interacting with the world - is shattered, or "fragmented," and in order to survive, the person must begin to replace that old self, those old ideas, with an entirely new worldview. (Athens and his theories are discussed much more fully in the previous essay, but since we warned you not to read that if you don't want to risk spoilage, the basic - and spoiler-free - parts are mentioned here.) Breaking Bad gives us this fragmentation beautifully. Note how from the viewer's perspective Walt is upside down as he is moved into the MRI machine, a motif smoothly repeated in the next scene with Walt's reflection in the top of the doctor's desk. Most discombobulating of all, however, is the consultation with the doctor. At first totally voiceless behind the tinnitus-like ambient soundtrack and faceless except for his chin and lips, the doctor and the news he is imparting are made unreal, out of place, and alien. As for Walt, in an exquisite touch of emotional realism, all he can focus on is the mustard stain on the doctor's lab coat. How many of us, confronted with such tragic news, have likewise found our attention focused, randomly, illogically, on some similar mundanity of life? It is from this shattered self that Walt begins to operate and things that would have been completely out of the question for pre-cancer Walt are now actual possibilities - things like finding a big score before he dies by making and selling pure crystal meth. Remember that Walt is a truly brilliant chemist, and knows full well what crystal meth is and what it does to people who use it. He may not know exactly what he's getting into, but he knows what he is doing. Enter Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul, best known previously for his role on Big Love), a skinny white-boy gangster wannabe, who under the name "Cap'n Cook" makes a living cooking and selling meth. He's also an ex-student of Walt's, and after being recognized by his former teacher during a drug bust, Walt has all the leverage he needs to coerce Jesse into helping him. Why does he need him? Because, as Walt says, "you know the business, and I know the chemistry." Symbolizing just how far beyond his old life Walt is moving, he and Jesse park their battered RV/meth lab in the desert outside of Albuquerque, far from the city and any signs of human life. All that is there is a rough dirt road and a "cow house" in the distance. The desert is a place without memory, a place outside of things, where secrets can be kept, and meth can be cooked. This is where Walt lives now. It is in this desert space that Walt becomes a killer, albeit in self defense. Ironically, the one thing that Walt views as holding the keys to the secret of life - chemistry - becomes the means to end lives. Walt, a father, teacher, and an integral part of an extended family - in other words, an agent of life and growth - has now become a meth cook, using chemical weapons to kill his enemies. Walter White has become an agent of death. The transformation is just beginning, but already Skyler (Anna Gunn, previously known for her roles on The Practice and Deadwood) is having some trouble recognizing her husband: "Walt? Is that you?" LAB NOTES Highlight: Jesse to Walt: "Man, some straight like you - giant stick up his ass all of a sudden at age what? Sixty? He's just going to break bad?" Did You Notice: This episode has the first (but not the last!) appearance of Walt's excuse that he's doing everything for his family. There's an award on the wall in Walt's house commemorating his contributions to work that was awarded the Nobel Prize back in 1985. The man's not a slouch when it comes to chemistry, so what's happened since then? At Walt's surprise birthday party, Walt is very awkward when he handles Hank's gun. Speaking of Hank (Dean Norris, whose other roles were in the TV series Medium, and the movies Total Recall, and Little Miss Sunshine), he waits until the school bus has left the neighborhood before ordering his team into the meth lab, showing what a good and careful cop he is. Maybe it's just us, but J.P. Wynne High School (where Walt teaches chemistry) seems to have the most well-equipped high school chemistry lab in the country. As Walt receives his diagnosis, the doctor's voice and all other sounds are drowned out by a kind of numbing ringing, signifying a kind of psychic overload that prevents Walt from being fully engaged with the external world. This effect will be used again several times throughout the series. Walt literally launders his money to dry it out, foreshadowing what's to come. Shooting Up: Thanks to John Toll, who served as cinematographer for the first season of Breaking Bad, the show has one of the most distinctive opening shots ever. Just watch those empty khaki pants flutter across a clear sky. Breaking Bad loves certain camera angles and this section is where we'll point out some of the shots that make the show stand out. Look at that taped non-confession Walt makes for his family when he thinks the cops are coming for him. We're used to watching recordings of characters - shows are filmed (or taped), but here, we're watching him recording himself on tape. Who's the real Walt? Title: Many pilot episodes share the name with the title of the show and Breaking Bad's pilot is no exception. Vince Gilligan, who grew up in Farmville, Virginia, has stated that "breaking bad" is a Southernism for going off the straight and narrow. When you bend a stick until it breaks, the stick usually breaks cleanly. But sometimes, sticks (and men) break bad. You can wind up in the hospital with a splinter in your eye, or you can wind up in Walter White's world. Either way, it's no kind of good. Interesting Facts: Show creator Vince Gilligan's early educational experience was at J. P. Wynne Campus School in Farmville, Virginia. He recycled the name for the high school in Breaking Bad. SPECIAL INGREDIENTS What Is Crystal Meth, Anyway? While there is some evidence that methamphetamine can be found naturally in several species of acacia plants, commercial meth making involves chemistry, not agriculture. The history of the drug dates back to 1893 when Japanese chemist Nagai Nagayoshi first synthesized the substance from ephedrine. The name "methamphetamine...

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Human Genetics - 2854334182

103,89 zł

Human Genetics SCION PUBLISHING

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Human Genetics 2e begins by describing basic human genetics, introduces the variety of techniques available for disease diagnosis and details how these are used in the lab, before concluding with information on prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and ethical considerations. As such, the book is the ideal handbook for biomedical science students and for anyone working in a diagnostic genetics lab. This new edition has been comprehensively rewritten to take into account the major changes in recent years, particularly with regard to human molecular genetics: * greater coverage of recently identified genes and their role in disease * updated to include an expanded section on breast cancer * expanded description of epigenetics including methylation and acetylation * updated to include all the latest diagnostic tools: QF-PCR, MLPA, RT-PCR, microarrays, etc. * more on the impact of genetics on society; ethics and dilemmas * full colour photographs have been included to allow readers to see real laboratory results If you need to know the difference between SNPs and CNVs, when to use QF-PCR or microarrays, or wondered which screening method to use for mutation detection, then you need to read this book. Reviews: "This revised edition of Human Genetics covers an impressive variety of topics within the field, and would certainly be suitable for an audience ranging from basic science undergraduates to people working within genetics in the medical profession...The material in this book is clearly laid out, and provides a comprehensive overview of the subject. The explicit list of learning objectives at the start of each chapter will be valued by students and teachers alike, and the explanatory sentence or two after each one provides a quick reference to the key take-home messages. Within the text, important facts and definitions are highlighted in boxes, and reinforced by straightforward and logical figures. The authors acknowledge that this is an introductory text, but also provide key references to further reading, enabling readers to easily expand their knowledge in specific areas of interest, yet achieving a fundamental grasp of the areas being presented. This further reading, along with the incredibly valuable self-assessment questions, will allow students to identify and address the limits of their knowledge. The emphasis on genetic disorders throughout the book will make it relevant to those studying the science of human genetics, but also to medical students throughout their studies. The glossary of disorders at the end of the book provides an excellent quick reference point, and the comprehensive list of internet sites directs the reader to many other well recognised resources for further information. In the age of information overload via the internet, such a list is incredibly valuable for helping students assess the quality of the information they are retrieving from online sources...This book will appeal to anyone with an interest in human genetics, particularly those approaching the subject from the point of view of a diagnostic laboratory." Dr Sally Chappell, IJMEG, April 2010 "Advances in genetics are continually being made, and Human Genetics provides an overview of up to date practice within this field. It reviews the basics of DNA, different modes of inheritance and gene function. This volume takes the reader through the different techniques used in both molecular genetics and cytogenetic laboratories, concluding with the clinical aspects of genetics. All aspects are clearly explained using diagrams and photographs to achieve clarity and promote understanding. This book acts as a good reference and revision guide for those working in the genetics field or for those new to genetics. It would also be useful to undergraduates in biomedical sciences, providing a quick reference guide to complement other text books in the field of genetics, which individually study the different areas outlined in Human Genetics in more detail. Human Genetics is easily navigated with clear chapters broken down into individual sections. It allows the reader to dip in and out of the book as required, yet at the same time, ensures that each area can be studied in more detail. The quick reference guide of conditions at the back of the book will be of particular value for clinicians. It not only gives a brief outline of the clinical aspects of the different conditions, but it also clearly states which laboratory techniques are used in the diagnosis of each condition. This will be invaluable for any clinician requesting testing, but unsure exactly which test is needed, and therefore uncertain as to what sample should be taken from the patient. Although this book provides an overview, it does, however, point the reader in the right direction to find more information on each individual area both through further reading and internet resources. The chapter on mechanisms of disease may not be new to scientists, but for those working in the clinical field without a strong science background these concepts may be fairly new to them. Human Genetics will aid in their understanding of different conditions, and the reports issued enabling them to translate this in a clear manner to patients. Throughout the book clear illustrations are used to clarify the techniques described and complement the text. It is particularly helpful to have 'true to life' pictures when the authors have described certain techniques, such as raw DNA sequence information as well as some of the cancer genetics techniques. These can only be truly understood by seeing a realistic output of the data to be analysed. The book is clearly written from a scientific perspective and, although it touches on some of the aspects of clinical genetics, it is important to realise that this is only very brief. This is the weaker side of the book, and so anyone in the clinical field would certainly need to be exploring clinical issues further, particularly in relation to complex family issues and the psychosocial aspects of genetic counselling. This book would be a useful text for those studying biomedical sciences or a Masters course in genetic counselling. Although there is no great depth to the book, and students will need to look elsewhere for more comprehensive texts on particular aspects, it does bring together the laboratory and clinical aspects of genetics. It also traces the path from the original discussion with a patient, through sample extraction to the laboratory techniques as well as exploring the mechanisms underlying the origin of the relevant genetic changes." C. Kirwan, Human Genetics, vol. 128, August 2010 "In order to evaluate a book one should know its intended audience. The preface to this book says that it, as was the first edition, should be relevant to first year undergraduates and newcomers to the medical profession; it is intended as an introduction to human genetics, to supplement other basic textbooks. The implication that the reader should already have a grounding in basic genetics is well founded. I doubt that the introductory chapters on cytogenetics (which gets into exons and introns) and molecular genetics would be understood without a previous grasp of the relation between the DNA triplet sequence in a gene with the amino-acid sequence of the corresponding protein. The authors have done a commendable job of updating the remarkable advances in molecular genetics of the past few years, ranging from new epigenetic insights, through automated techniques for high through-put screening, to the use of microarrays in molecular cytogenetics. But scanning of the volume suggests that it would be more suitably directed to laboratory, rather than clinical geneticists. There is, for example, a full page box listing the constituents of a culture medium, more suited to a lab manual than a text book. Nowhere does the book list the credentials of the authors, but a Google search reveals that Dr Davies is Head of Laboratories at the Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK. Laboratory geneticists should find the sections on molecular cytogenetics (FISH, CGH), molecular genetics (Southern blotting, PCR), cancer genetics, and prenatal diagnosis particularly useful. Clinical geneticists may appreciate them as a source of information about what lies behind the reports of molecular diagnoses they receive from the laboratories. Clinical geneticists would be better off to turn to one of the other texts recommended at the ends of each chapter. Multifactorial inheritance gets short shrift, having only a few sentences in a section entitled "Gradation of Inheritance". And multifactorial conditions are not in the list of reasons for referral to genetic services - presumably because they usually do not engender requisitions for laboratory tests. The chapter on genetic counseling does not mention the use of empirical recurrence risks in genetic counseling, or include anything about its psychodynamics. There are remarkably few typographical errors (I only found one), and a few unclear or incorrect statements. The colored illustrations are of good quality, and some are beautiful, including that on the cover, but the black and white ones need some improvement. In recognition of our increasing predilection for abbreviations, the book begins with a useful two and a half page list of them." F. Clarke Fraser, American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A, July 2010

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Infinite Monkey Cage: Series 4 - 2834154627

29,68 zł

Infinite Monkey Cage: Series 4 BBC Audiobooks Ltd

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

This title is presented on 2CDs. Physicist Brian Cox and comedian Robin Ince return for the fourth series of the Sony Radio Academy Gold Award-winning BBC Radio 4 show in which they take a witty, irreverent and unashamedly rational look at the world according to science. In the first episode, "What Don't We Know?", the Infinite Monkeys will be asking what don't we know, do we know what we don't know, does science know what it doesn't know, and are there some things that science will never be able to know? Joining them on stage are the comedian Paul Foot, biologist Professor Steve Jones and cosmologist and science writer Marcus Chown. In Episode 2, "6 Degrees", Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by special guest Stephen Fry and science writer Simon Singh to find out whether we really are only 6 degrees of separation from anyone else. In Episode 3, "So You Want to Be an Astronaut?", Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined by comedian Helen Keen and space medicine expert Dr Kevin Fong to discuss the future of human space travel. In the fourth episode of this series, "Is Cosmology Really a Science?" , Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined on stage by "V for Vendetta" author and legendary comic book writer Alan Moore, cosmologist Ed Copeland, and science broadcaster Dallas Campbell to ask whether cosmology is really a science. Episode 5 is a special edition, recorded at the Glastonbury Festival, in which Robin Ince and Brian Cox aim to prove that science really is the new rock n' roll. They are joined on stage by musicians Billy Bragg and Graham Coxon, comedian Shappi Khorsandi, and scientist Professor Tony Ryan. In the final episode of the series, "Science v The Supernatural: Does Science Kill the Magic?", Robin Ince and Brian Cox are joined on stage by actor and magician Andy Nyman, psychologist Richard Wiseman and neuroscientist Bruce Hood as they take on the paranormal. This title is winner of a Sony Radio Academy Gold Award for Best Speech Programme. "A brilliant way of being both innovative and instructive, bringing humour to what some will see as a dull subject. It's listenable, educational and brings a whole new audience to both the subject and the station". ("The Judges").

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Forever War - 2212845114

37,50 zł

Forever War Vintage Books

Powieści i opowiadania

Contrary to much that has been and is being written on the Anglo-American (plus coalition) wars and occupation in Iraq and Afghanistan, Dexter Filkins' book "The Forever War" is not a political book. That is to say, it deals with political issues of necessity, but it does not make a political argument of any particular kind. Rather, Filkins, a war correspondent for the New York Times, has operated as a tabula rasa on which the war events he witnessed could make their impression, without any preconceived notions or arguments getting in the way. This has the definite advantage that Filkins does not add to the pile of increasingly irrelevant argumentation about the possibilities of ill-defined "success" in these regions, but rather lets the reader vicariously experience the reality of living and fighting in these war-torn countries. In a way, this is nonetheless a political argument on its own, as despite Filkins' good relations with the American soldiers he joined as an 'embedded reporter', it is clear from his experiences that not much is being achieved by way of either 'nation-building' or establishing lasting security in these countries, indeed the least any occupier with pretentions of superiority could do. The fact that Filkins does not explicitly make this argument, or any argument, is fairly pleasant in that it lets the experiences speak for themselves in a more subtle manner than newspaper moralizing often permits. However, this book also has clear downsides. Filkins does not give much, if any, background information on the combatant parties involved or even of the countries, other than the absolutely necessary. What's more, his war reporting uses a heavily colloquial style that is very grating initially and makes him seem to 'try too hard' to come off as cool, detached and rough - perhaps this is something that he took over from the Marines he was stationed with, but it does not in my view help the book's readability any. One does get used to it and over the course of the book he gets more serious, but the first few chapters are rather annoying. The main value of the book is probably the service it does to humanizing the people involved, both of the occupying armies and their opponents. They say that truth is the first casualty of war, but surely the greatest casualty of war is a sense of shared humanity. Indeed it is hard to get any group to fight any other without in some way dehumanizing them first, and all the political argumentation of the world does not suffice of itself to repair a warped view of this kind once it is dominant. What can do so is a vivid description of real people and their human traits and follies. It used to be that literature played this role, but the authority and impact of the writer has diminished; now perhaps journalists can take this over to some extent. Some people combine this with the political argumentation for the greatest possible effect, like Robert Fisk does for example, but even if one leaves out the politics, the experience of humanization alone is very valuable. This is what Filkins' book contributes.

Sklep: Albertus.pl

Soul of Screenwriting - 2854266022

187,66 zł

Soul of Screenwriting CONTINUUM

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Uniquely inspired by the work of mythologist Joseph Campbell and psychologist Jean Houston, "The Soul of Screenwriting" demonstrates how the "screenwriting by numbers" approach that offers templates into which the writer may mechanically drop his or her story idea is fundamentally incomplete. Keith Cunningham maintains that in doing so, one ignores the process of writing. Screenwriting is a long journey and even the most gifted screenwriters get lost along the way. Getting lost, too, is part of the process.What the writer experiences in the act of writing has never been taken into account, yet this is where the screenplay comes from: the writer's here-and-now experience while working on the story. Information - left-brain concepts and techniques about plot structure, character development and orchestration, the dynamics of scenes and sequences - is all necessary. But it is what one does with the information that makes a truly great screenplay. In this book Cunningham demonstrates that good screenwriting is more than hitting the big plot points with exciting action. Good screenwriting also has integrity and authenticity. It has a voice, and because of this it speaks to the audience.To gain a voice, the writer needs the heat of creative imagination: passion, commitment, enthusiasm, a drive to know the truth of the characters and an urge to get to the core of the dramatic conflict without resorting to escapism. These are qualities of the heart, and as Cunningham argues, screenwriting can indeed be a path with heart.

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Storm of Creativity - 2854371558

112,47 zł

Storm of Creativity MIT Press

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Although each instance of creativity is singular and specific, Kyna Leski tells us, the creative process is universal. Artists, architects, poets, inventors, scientists, and others all navigate the same stages of the process in order to discover something that does not yet exist. All of us must work our way through the empty page, the blank screen, writer's block, confusion, chaos, and doubt. In this book, Leski draws from her observations and experiences as a teacher, student, maker, writer, and architect to describe the workings of the creative process.§Leski sees the creative process as being like a storm; it slowly begins to gather and take form until it overtakes us - if we are willing to let it. It is dynamic, continually in motion; it starts, stops, rages and abates, ebbs and flows. In illustrations that accompany each chapter, she maps the arc of the creative process by tracing the path of water droplets traveling the stages of a storm.§Leski describes unlearning, ridding ourselves of preconceptions; only when we realize what we don't know can we pose the problem that we need to solve. We gather evidence - with notebook jottings, research, the collection of objects - propelling the process. We perceive and conceive; we look ahead without knowing where we are going; we make connections. We pause, retreat, and stop, only to start again. To illustrate these stages of the process, Leski draws on examples of creative practice that range from Paul Klee to Steve Jobs, from the discovery of continental drift to the design of Antoni Gaudí's Sagrada Familia.§Creativity, Leski tells us, is a path with no beginning or end; it is ongoing. This revelatory view of the creative process will be an essential guide for anyone engaged in creative discovery.

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Content Marketing Made Easy - 2854479762

117,08 zł

Content Marketing Made Easy Manor House Publishing Inc

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

"Susan Crossman, marketing expert and author of several critically acclaimed books, offers clear, easy-to-follow advice to make anyone - even a complete novice - a content-marketing pro in no time... great tips and techniques to give you the edge you need." - Michael Davie, author, Winning Ways We are moving towards a world where a huge percentage of business is done online and if you are not playing in that field, eventually you aren't going to have a business... the revolution has only just begun... the only constant in our world is change itself... Pretending these changes aren't happening won't make them go away. I believe that developing and polishing our online content is the key to the kingdom... it is a process that can be taught, learned and duplicated. Once you have a program up and running, it's a straightforward way to generate more business... Online marketing can be intimidating, no doubt about it, and I spend my days simplifying it for business people so they can generate more revenue as a result of their online activities. We focus on a subset of online marketing that currently flies under the label of content marketing." By the end of this book I aim to help you figure out what that is, why it's important and how it works, and hopefully I'll be able to crack open a door to the future for you and your business that is filled with possibility." - Susan Crossman, author, Content Marketing Made Easy - Why You Need It / How To Do It Susan Crossman is a veteran writer who has spent decades wielding the power tool of language to benefit businesses and individuals in search of greater success and consistent results. Via her content marketing company, Crossman Communications (www.crossmancommunications.com), Susan and her team create high quality online content that helps businesses connects with their target audience, explain their business proposition, differentiate them in a competitive market and motivate their ideal customers to take action. An enthusiastic supporter of writing with clarity, she is the traditionally published author of four books: a novel (Shades of Teale), a collection of short stories (Passages to Epiphany), a writer's companion to help people write with more impact (The Write Way), and a book that explains the mysteries of content marketing (Content Marketing Made Easy - Why You Need It / How To Do It).

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Bakuman - 2826653660

34,47 zł

Bakuman Viz Media

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Average student Moritaka Mashiro enjoys drawing for fun. When his classmate and aspiring writer Akito Takagi discovers his talent, he begs Moritaka to team up with him as a manga-creating duo. But what exactly does it take to make it in the manga-publishing world? Moritaka is hesitant to seriously consider Akito's proposal because he knows how difficult reaching the professional level can be. Still, encouragement from persistent Akito and motivation from his crush push Moritaka to test his limits! Moritaka and Akito face the prospect of their series being canceled in Shonen Jump due to dropping popularity. Can the duo avoid the axe and keep fighting? And when Akito starts becoming friendly with fellow manga creator Ko Aoki, how will it affect his long-term relationship with Kaya?

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Map of Meaning - 2854334246

129,78 zł

Map of Meaning Greenleaf Publishing

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

This book introduces a "Map of Meaning" called the Holistic Development Model, which provides a clear, simple and profound framework of the dimensions and process of living and working meaningfully. Like all reliable maps this one has been carefully tested. It is based on over 15 years' research into the insights and practice of ordinary people. Although the authors borrow from the work of philosophers, psychologists and sociologists to provide evidence and context for their ideas, the main contribution of this book is that it describes how ordinary human beings wrestle with, and give answers to, the questions of "What is meaningful work and a meaningful life?" This innate human knowledge is captured in a practical model that makes understanding and working with issues of meaning clear and accessible to everyone. At an individual level this book helps people to define and stay in contact with what is most important to them as they grapple with the real problems of daily life and suggests how to they can stay in charge of keeping the human search for meaning alive, especially in the face of the challenges that exist in organisational life. The authors recognise that in the current economic context a simple map of meaning is essential, precisely because organisational life has become so intensely directed towards a singular economic goal. They argue that it is vital that people have a simple and powerful way to reclaim the significance of meaning in their working lives. There are numerous studies that show conclusively that meaningful work, or its absence, influences some important outcomes in organisational life such as motivation, absenteeism, work behaviour, engagement, job satisfaction, empowerment, stress and performance. But people's humanity and search for meaning, so often compromised at work, is not something that can be mechanised by the latest self-help or managerial technique. It is not something that can be picked up and dropped as convenient. The authors argue that being human is not a fad. Being human is enduring and needs to be taken seriously. Creating meaningful work, therefore, leads to many desired organisational outcomes, but implementing it does require the courage to question some fundamental ways of thinking about business and the integrity to engage with the issues sincerely. At an organisational level this book offers many practical examples of how to build and maintain workplaces that are meaningful to people. The idea that there is a parallel between the meanings, decision-making dynamics and actions of individuals and organisations is central to the structure of this book. It therefore addresses meaning at both individual and organisational level and in the dynamic between them. This is neither a self-help book, nor an organisational systems book; its strength is that it draws together the aspirations of individuals with those of the organisations in which they work. At the same time, this is not a naive book. One of the strengths of the Holistic Development Model is that it takes tensions, paradoxes and imperfections as a given. They are part of being human and they are part of organisations. The book is not only about the importance of living meaningfully, it is about how to do it. The book is full of stories of people who have worked with the model. They demonstrate the versatility of the model and how it helps them to analyse, speak to, plan around and respond to an enormous variety of everyday issues and situations. It is this resourcefulness the authors would like readers to get from this book and have at their fingertips. This book is primarily written for anyone, from a CEO to a blue-collar worker or consultant, who is interested in creating more meaning and purpose in work and organisations, and who would like to better understand how to get others on board. It is for those searching for ways to re-energise their roles or change their careers. It is for anyone who firmly believes that it must be possible to align our deeper life purposes with our daily actions in the workplace.

Sklep: Libristo.pl

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