krainaksiazek invisible light or the electric theory of creation 20121132

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Quantum Field Theory - 2826627838

131,04 zł


Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Preface General References 1. Classical Theory 1.1 Principle of Least Action 1.1.1 Classical Motion 1.1.2 Electromagnetic Field as an Infinite Dynamical System 1.1.3 Electromagnetic Interaction of a Point Particle 1.2 Symmetries and Conservation Laws 1.2.1 Fundamental Invariants 1.2.2 Energy Momentum Tensor 1.2.3 Internal Symmetries 1.3 Propagation and Radiation 1.3.1 Green Functions 1.3.2 Radiation 2. The Dirac Equation 2.1 Toward a Relativistic Wave Equation 2.1.1 Quantum Mechanics and Relativity 2.1.2 The Dirac Equation 2.1.3 Relativistic Covariance 2.2 Physical Content 2.2.1 Plane Wave Solutions and Projectors 2.2.2 Wave Packets 2.2.3 Electromagnetic Coupling 2.2.4 Foldy-Wouthuysen Transformation 2.3 Hydrogen-like Atoms 2.3.1 Nonrelativistic versus Relativistic Spectrum 2.3.2 Dirac Theory 2.4 Hole Theory and Charge Conjugation 2.4.1 Reinterpretation of Negative Energy Solutions 2.4.2 Charge Conjugation 2.4.3 Zero-Mass Particles 2.5 Dirac Propagator 2.5.1 Free Propagator 2.5.2 Propagation in an Arbitrary External Electromagnetic Field 2.5.3 Application to the Coulomb Scattering 2.5.4 Fock-Schwinger Proper Time Method 3. Quantization--Free Fields 3.1 Canonical Quantization 3.1.1 General Formulation 3.1.2 Scalar Field 3.1.3 Charged Scalar Field 3.1.4 Time-Ordered Product 3.1.5 Thermodynamic Equilibrium 3.2 Quantized Radiation Field 3.2.1 Indefinite Metric 3.2.2 Propagator 3.2.3 Massive Vector Field 3.2.4 Vacuum Fluctuations 3.3 Dirac Field and Exclusion Principle 3.3.1 Anticommutators 3.3.2 Fock Space for Fermions 3.3.3 Relation between Spin and Statistics--Propagator 3.4 Discrete Symmetries 3.4.1 Parity 3.4.2 Charge Conjugation 3.4.3 Time Reversal 3.4.4 Summary 4. Interaction with an External Field 4.1 Quantized Electromagnetic Field Interacting with a Classical Source 4.1.1 Emission Probabilities 4.1.2 Emitted Energy and the Infrared Catastrophe 4.1.3 Induced Absorption and Emission 4.1.4 S Matrix and Evolution Operator 4.2 Wick's Theorem 4.2.1 Bose Fields 4.2.2 Fermi Fields 4.2.3 General Case 4.3 Quantized Dirac Field Interacting with a Classical Potential 4.3.1 General Formalism 4.3.2 Emission Rate to Lowest Order 4.3.3 Pair Creation in a Constant Uniform Electric Field 4.3.4 The Euler-Heisenberg Effective Lagrangian 5. Elementary Processes 5.1 S Matrix and Asymptotic Theory 5.1.1 Cross Sections 5.1.2 Asymptotic Theory 5.1.3 Reduction Formulas 5.1.4 Generating Functional 5.1.5 Connected Parts 5.1.6 Fermions 5.1.7 Photons 5.2 Applications 5.2.1 Compton Effect 5.2.2 Pair Annihilation 5.2.3 Positronium Lifetime 5.2.4 Bremsstrahlung 5.3 Unitarity and Causality 5.3.1 Unitarity and Partial Wave Decomposition 5.3.2 Causality and Analyticity 5.3.3 The Jost-Lehmann-Dyson Representation 5.3.4 Forward Dispersion Relations 5.3.5 Momentum Transfer Analyticity 6. Perturbation Theory 6.1 Interaction Representation and Feynman Rules 6.1.1 Self-Interacting Scalar Field 6.1.2 Feynman Rules for Spinor Electrodynamics 6.1.3 Electron-Electron and Electron-Positron Scattering 6.1.4 Scalar Electrodynamics 6.2 Diagrammatics 6.2.1 Loopwise Expansion 6.2.2 Truncated and Proper Diagrams 6.2.3 Parametric Representation 6.2.4 Euclidean Green Functions 6.3 Analyticity Properties 6.3.1 Landau Equations 6.3.2 Real Singularities 6.3.3 Real Singularities of Simple Diagrams 6.3.4 Physical-Region Singularities. Cutkosky Rules 7. Radiative Corrections 7.1 One-Loop Renormalization 7.1.1 Vacuum Polarization 7.1.2 Electron Propagator 7.1.3 Vertex Function 7.1.4 Summary 7.2 Radiative Corrections to the Interaction with an External Field 7.2.1 Effective Interaction and Anomalous Magnetic Moment 7.2.2 Radiative Corrections to Coulomb Scattering 7.2.3 Soft Bremsstrahlung 7.2.4 Finite Inclusive Cross Section 7.3 New Effects 7.3.1 Photon-Photon Scattering 7.3.2 Lamb Shift 7.3.3 Van der Waals Forces at Large Distances 8. Renormalization 8.1 Regularization and Power Counting 8.1.1 Introduction 8.1.2 Regularization 8.1.3 Power Counting 8.1.4 Convergence Theorem 8.2 Renormalization 8.2.1 Normalization Conditions and Structure of the Counterterms 8.2.2 Bogoliubov's Recursion Formula 8.2.3 Zimmermann's Explicit Solution 8.2.4 Renormalization in Parametric Space 8.2.5 Finite Renormalizations 8.2.6 Composite Operators 8.3 Zero-Mass Limit, Asymptotic Behavior, and Weinberg's Theorem 8.3.1 Massless Theories 8.3.2 Ultraviolet Behavior and Weinberg's Theorem 8.4 The Case of Quantum Electrodynamics 8.4.1 Formal Derivation of the Ward-Takahashi Identities 8.4.2 Pauli-Villars Regularization to All Orders 8.4.3 Renormalization 8.4.4 Two-Loop Vacuum Polarization 9. Functional Methods 9.1 Path Integrals 9.1.1 The Role of the Classical Action in Quantum Mechanics 9.1.2 Trajectories in the Bargmann-Fock Space 9.1.3 Fermion Systems 9.2 Relativistic Formulation 9.2.1 S Matrix and Green Functions in Terms of Path Integrals 9.2.2 Effective Action and Steepest-Descent Method 9.3 Constrained Systems 9.3.1 General Discussion 9.3.2 The Electromagnetic Field as an Example 9.4 Large Orders in Perturbation Theory 9.4.1 Introduction 9.4.2 Anharmonic Oscillator 10. Integral Equations and Bound-State Problems 10.1 The Dyson-Schwinger Equations 10.1.1 Field Equations 10.1.2 Renormalization 10.2 Relativistic Bound States 10.2.1 Homogeneous Bethe-Salpeter Equation 10.2.2 The Wick Rotation 10.2.3 Scalar Massless Exchange in the Ladder Approximation &n 12.3 The Effective Action at the One-Loop Order 12.3.1 General Form 12.3.2 Two-Point Function 12.3.3 Other Functions 12.3.4 One-Loop Renormalization 12.4 Renormalization 12.4.1 Slavnov-Taylor Identities 12.4.2 Identities for Proper Functions 12.4.3 Recursive Construction of the Counterterms 12.4.4 Gauge Dependence of Green Functions 12.4.5 Anomalies 12.5 Massive Gauge Fields 12.5.1 Historical Background 12.5.2 Massive Gauge Theory 12.5.3 Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking 12.5.4 Renormalization of Spontaneously Broken Gauge 12.5.5 Gauge Independence and Unitarity of the S Matrix 12.6 The Weinberg-Salam Model 12.6.1 The Model for Leptons 12.6.2 Electron-Neutrino Cross Sections 12.6.3 Higher-Order Corrections 12.6.4 Incorporation of Hadrons 13. Asymptotic Behavior 13.1 Effective Charge in Electrodynamics 13.1.1 The Gell-Mann and Low Function 13.1.2 The Callan-Symanzik Equation 13.2 Broken Scale Invariance 13.2.1 Scale and Conformal Invariance 13.2.2 Modified Ward Identities 13.2.3 Callan-Symanzik Coefficients to Lowest Order 13.3 Scale Invariance Recovered 13.3.1 Coupling Constant Flow 13.3.2 Asymptotic Freedom 13.3.3 Mass Corrections 13.4 Deep Inelastic Lepton-Hadron Scattering and Electron-Positron Annihilation into Hadrons 13.4.1 Electroproduction 13.4.2 Light-Cone Dynamics 13.4.3 Electron-Positron Annihilation 13.5 Operator Product Expansions 13.5.1 Short-Distance Expansion 13.5.2 Dominant and Subdominant Operators, Operator Mixing, and Conservation Laws 13.5.3 Light-Cone Expansion Appendix A-1 Metric A-2 Dirac Matrices and Spinors A-3 Normalization of States, S Matrix, Unitarity, and Cross Sections A-4 Feynman Rules Index


Hidden Attraction - 2840795771

189,76 zł

Hidden Attraction Oxford University Press Inc

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

Long one of nature's most fascinating phenomena, magnetism was once the subject of many superstitions. Magnets were thought useful to thieves, effective as a love potion or as a cure for gout or spasms. They could remove sorcery from women and put demons to flight and even reconcile married couples. It was said that a lodestone pickled in the salt of sucking fish had the power to attract gold. Today, these beliefs have been put aside, but magnetism is no less remarkable for our modern understanding of it. In Hidden Attraction, Gerrit L. Verschuur, a noted astronomer and National Book Award nominee for The Invisible Universe, traces the history of our fascination with magnetism, from the first discovery of magnets in Greece, to state-of-the-art theories that see magnetism as a basic force in the universe. The book begins with the early debunking of superstitions by Peter Peregrinus (Pierre de Maricourt), whom Roger Bacon hailed as one of the world's first experimental scientists (Perigrinus held that "experience rather than argument is the basis of certainty in science"). Verschuur discusses William Gilbert, who confronted the multitude of superstitions about lodestones in De Magnete, widely regarded as the first true work of modern science, in which Gilbert reported his greatest insight: that the earth itself was magnetic. We also meet Hans Christian Oersted, who demonstrated that an electric current could influence a magnet (Oersted did this for the first time during a public lecture) and Andre-Marie Ampere, who showed that a current actually produced magnetism. Verschuur also examines the pioneering experiments and theoretical breakthroughs of Faraday and Maxwell and Zeeman (who demonstrated the relationship between light and magnetism), and he includes many lively stories of discovery, such as the use of frogs by Galvani and Volta, and Hertz's accidental discovery of radio waves. Along the way, we learn many interesting scientific facts, perhaps the most remarkable of which is that lodestones are made by bacteria (a sediment organism known as GS-15 eats iron, converting ferric oxide to magnetite and, over billions of years, forming the magnetite layers in iron formations). Boasting many informative illustrations, this is an adventure of the mind, using the specific phenomenon of magnetism to show how we have moved from an era of superstitions to one in which the Theory of Everything looms on the horizon.


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