krainaksiazek the lost and found sometimes life is about taking a step back to go forward 20091194

- znaleziono 5 produktów w 3 sklepach

And His Brazos Valley Boy - 2839413344

979,99 zł

And His Brazos Valley Boy Bear Family Records

Muzyka>Country

1. Swing Wide Your Gate Of Love 2. Whoa Sailor 3. California Women 4. What Are We Gonna Do About The Moonlight 5. A Lonely Heart Knows 6. Starry Eyed Texas Gal 7. Humpty Dumpty Heart 8. Today 9. Don't Flirt With Me 10. Rock In The Ocean 11. My Heart Is A Jigsaw Puzzle 12. Yesterday's Mail (Chat & False Start) 13. Yesterday's Mail 14. I Find You Cheatin' On Me 15. Second Hand Gal 16. You Broke My Heart (Chat & False Start) 17. You Broke My Heart 18. Mary Had A Little Lamb 19. You Remembered Me 20. California Women 21. The Green Light 22. What Are We Gonna Do About The Moonlight 23. All That Goes Up Must Come Down 24. Standing On The Outside Looking In Now 25. Tomorrow Night 26. My Front Door Is Open 27. Soft Lips 28. Swing Wide Your Gate Of Love 29. Whoa Sailor 30. The Grass Looks Greener Over Yonder 31. She's A Girl Without Any Sweetheart 101. Take A Look At This Broken Heart Of Mine 102. Give A Little, Take A Little 103. A Cat Has Nine Lives 104. Beautiful Texas 105. Daddy Blues 106. How Do You Feel 107. New Rovin' Gambler 108. Humpty Dumpty Boogie 109. Can't Feel At Home In This World Anymore 110. When God Calls His Children Home 111. If I Cry 112. A Broken Heart & A Glass Of Beer 113. The Devil In My Angels Eyes 114. Playin' Possum 115. Where Is Your Heart Tonight 116. Those Things Money Can't Buy 117. Hangover Heart 118. I Ain't Cryin' Over You 119. You Were The Cause 120. I'll Be Your Sweetheart For A Day 121. Love Thief 122. Teardrops On The Tea Leaves 123. The Wild Side Of Life 124. Waiting In The Lobby Of Your Heart 125. Don't Make Me Cry Again 126. Cryin' In The Deep Blue Sea 127. The New Wears Off Too Fast 128. You're Walking On My Heart 129. It's Better To Have Loved A Little 130. How Cold Hearted Can You Get 201. How Cold Hearted Can You Get 202. Rub-a-dub-dub 203. I'd Have Never Found Somebody New 204. Where My Sweet Baby Used To Walk 205. I'll Sign My Heart Away 206. Yesterday's Girl 207. John Henry 208. The Letter Edged In Black 209. Mother The Queen Of My Heart 210. At The Rainbow's End 211. When You're Lovin', You're Livin' 212. You Don't Have The Nerve 213. I Saw My Mother's Name 214. No Help Wanted 215. Go Cry Your Heart Out 216. Wake Up, Irene 217. A Fooler, A Faker 218. Breakin' The Rules 219. We've Gone Too Far 220. If Lovin' You Is Wrong 221. Tears Are Only Rain 222. Annie Over 223. This Train 224. The Little Rosewood Casket 225. Gloria 226. Honky-tonk Girl 227. Jersey Bounce 228. Sunrise Serenade 229. Johnson Rag 230. Dardanella 301. When Your Love Burns Low 302. A New Deal Of Love 303. Baby I Need Lovin' 304. I'd Do It Again 305. Dusty Skies 306. A Lonely Heart Knows 307. The New Green Light 308. Tomorrow Night 309. Today 310. Simple Simon 311. Most Of All 312. Breakin' In Another Heart 313. Too In Love 314. String Of Pearls 315. Big Beaver 316. Panhandle Rag 317. Wildwood Flower 318. Honey, Honey Bee Ball 319. Quicksand 320. You Can Give Me Back My Heart 321. Don't Take It Out On Me 322. Red Skin Girl 323. Westphalia Waltz 324. Don't Be That Way 325. It Makes No Difference Now 326. Anybody's Girl 327. Taking My Chances 328. I'm Not Mad, Just Hurt 329. The Blackboard Of My Heart 330. Across The Alley From The Alamo 331. Weeping Willow 401. Prosperity Special 402. I'll Be Your Sweetheart For A Day 403. Under The Double Eagle 404. Don't Flirt With Me 405. Standing On The Outside Looking In Now 406. My Front Door Is Open 407. Swing Wide Your Gate Of Love 408. Humpty Dumpty Heart 409. Whoa Sailor 410. I Find You Cheatin' On Me 411. The Grass Looks Greener Over Yonder 412. You Remembered Me 413. You'll Be The One 414. I Don't Want To Know 415. Someone Can Steal Your Love From Me 416. Old Napoleon 417. I Was The First One 418. Rockin' In The Congo 419. Hang Your Head In Shame 420. The Gypsy 421. Don't Get Around Much Anymore 422. I Didn't Mean To Fall In Love 423. A Girl In The Night 424. Don't Look Now 425. Bubbles In My Beer 426. Headin' Down The Wrong Highway 427. Drivin' Nails In My Coffin 428. Lawdy, What A Gal 429. After All The Things I've Done 430. Make Room In Your Heart 501. I Wouldn't Miss It For The World 502. Klishama Klingo 503. Li'l Liza Jane 504. If I'm Not Too Late 505. Just An Old Flame 506. How Do You Hold A Memory 507. Beaumont Rag 508. Summit Ridge Drive 509. Woodchopper's Ball 510. Bartender's Polka 511. Wednesday Waltz 512. Gold & Silver Waltz 513. Skater's Waltz 514. Fifty Year Ago Waltz 515. La Zinda Waltz 516. The Anniversary Waltz 517. Let Me Call You Sweetheart 518. What Will I Do On Monday 519. You're Going Back To Your Old Ways Again 520. I've Run Out Of Tomorrows 521. Shenandoah Waltz 522. Signed, Sealed & Delivered 523. In The Valley Of The Moon 524. The Warm Red Wine 525. Squaws Along The Yukon 526. Two Hearts Deep In The Blues 527. Gathering Flowers 601. Little Blossom 602. Deep Elem 603. Rovin' Gambler 604. Cocaine Blues 605. May I Sleep In Your Barn Tonight Mister? 606. I'll Be A Bachelor Till I Die 607. Three Times Seven 608. Bumming Around 609. I Left My Gal In The Mountains 610. Teach 'Em How To Swim 611. Drunkard's Blues 612. Dry Bread 613. Lost John 614. I Guess I'm Getting Over You 615. What Made Her Change 616. Total Strangers 617. Just One Step Away 618. Coconut Grove 619. Tuxedo Junction 620. Give The World A Smile 621. Love Thief 622. The Gypsy & The Tealeaves 623. Soft Lips 624. Cryin' In The Deep Blue Sea 625. Hangover Heart 626. How Do You Feel 627. Those Things Money Can't Buy 628. Give A Little, Take A Little 629. Rock In The Ocean 701. Take A Look At This Broken Heart Of Mine 702. She's A Girl Without Any Sweetheart 703. A Fooler, A Faker 704. A Six Pack To Go 705. Will We Start It All Over Again 706. She's Just A Whole Lot Like You 707. There My Future Goes 708. Too In Love 709. Teach Me How To Lie 710. It's Got To Be A Habit 711. It's My Fault 712. I'd Like To Tell You 713. I'll Be Around 714. Just An Old Faded Photograph 715. I Dreamed Of An Old Love Affair 716. Sing Me Something Sentimental 717. Paying Off The Interest With My Tears 718. I Keep Meeting Girls Like You 719. My Old Flame 720. Just A Little While 721. I've Convinced Everybody But Myself 722. I Gotta Have My Baby Back 723. Oklahoma Hills 724. Hangover Tavern 725. Honky Tonk Town 726. I'd Look Forward To Tomorrow 727. How Many Teardrops Will It Take 728. Drop Me Gently 801. That's The Recipe For A Heartache 802. Blue Skirt Waltz 803. I Cast A Lonesome Shadow 804. San Antonio Rose 805. Detour 806. I Don't Hurt Anymore 807. Pick Me Up On Your Way Down 808. Beer Barrel Polka 809. The Wild Side Of Life 810. Yesterday's Girl 811. Wabash Cannon Ball 812. Then I'll Keep On Loving You 813. Shot-gun Boogie 814. Back Street Affair 815. You Nearly Lose Your Mind 816. The Eyes Of Texas 817. The More In Love Your Heart Is 818. I Wasn't Even In The Running 819. The Luckiest Heartache In Town 820. Whatever Happened To Mary 821. Twice As Much 822. Just To Ease The Pain 823. Reaching For The Moon 824. Stirring Up The Ashes 901. Paper Doll 902. There's No You 903. You Always Hurt The One You Love 904. September In The Rain 905. Till Then 906. That's All There Is To That 907. Breakin' In Another Heart 908. How Do You Hold A Memory 909. Don't Take It Out On Me 910. I'd Have Never Found Somebody New 911. It's Better To Have Loved A Little 912. Just An Old Flame 913. Life's Sweetest Moment 914. I'm Gonna Practice Freedom 915. Then I'll Start Believing In You 916. In The Back Of Your Mind 917. Here Comes Santa Claus 918. Gonna Wrap My Heart In Ribbons 919. It's Christmas Every Day In Alaska 920. Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town 921. Blue Christmas 922. Silver Bells 923. It's Christmas Time 924. I'd Like To Have An Elephant For Christmas 925. White Christmas 926. Little Christmas Angel 927. Mr. & Mrs. Snowman 928. Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer 929. We Wish You A Merry Christmas 1001. Intro 1002. Honky-tonk Girl 1003. I Guess I'm Getting Over You 1004. I'll Step Aside 1005. Orange Blossom Special 1006. I Didn't Mean To Fall In Love 1007. John Henry 1008. Nine Pound Hammer 1009. She's Just A Whole Lot Like You 1010. Have I Told You Lately That I Love You 1011. Steel Guitar Rag 1012. Just One Step Away 1013. Lost Highway 1014. A Six Pack To Go 1015. Intro 1016. Annie Over 1017. Drop Me Gently 1018. Forgive Me 1019. Rose City Chimes 1020. You're Walking On My Heart 1021. Oklahoma Hills 1022. That's The Recipe For A Heartache 1023. Darling What More Can I Say 1024. Hangover Tavern 1025. I'll Sign My Heart Away 1026. Teach Me How To Lie 1027. Cincinnati Lou 1101. Intro 1102. Deep In The Heart Of Texas 1103. My Heart Is A Playground 1104. Charmaine 1105. How Many Teardrops Will It Take 1106. The New Wears Off Too Fast 1107. Rub-a-dub-dub 1108. Intro 1109. Beautiful Texas 1110. Will We Start It All Over Again 1111. River Road Two Step 1112. I Cast A Lonesome Shadow 1113. Simple Simon 1114. There's A Little Bit Of Everything In Texas 1115. The Eyes Of Texas

Sklep: Gigant.pl

Natasha's Dance - 2212836413

54,10 zł

Natasha's Dance Penguin

Powieści i opowiadania

Orlando Figes

Sklep: Albertus.pl

Roaring Nineties - 2212835695

40,80 zł

Roaring Nineties Penguin

Biznes

His previous book revealed the shocking truth about globalization. Now, Joseph Stiglitz blows the whistle on the devastation wrought by the free market mantra in the nineties

Sklep: Albertus.pl

EURO TRASH - 2852496289

95,59 zł

EURO TRASH Merve

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

EVEN THOUGH WE'RE ALL INTERNATIONALISTS, FOR NOW THE BOOK WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE IN GERMAN. With contributions from Damir Arsenijevic, Alain Badiou, Étienne Balibar, Gracie Mae Bradley, Cédric Durand, the European Space Agency (sort of), Sara Farris, Alexandre Kojčve, Maurizio Lazzarato, Sandro Mezzadra, Toni Negri, Thomas Piketty, Beatriz Preciado, Bernard Stiegler, Martin Wolf, Slavoj Zizek. And to top it all off, check out our exclusive "Europe from Detroit" mix that comes courtesy of acid legend Carlos Souffront. No, not another debate on Europe, not just the usual policy proposals, no moralising appeals. We simply want to take stock of our ignorance in order to turn it into something more productive. Call it recycling if you will. The contributions in the volume do not reflect anything like a unity of vision. Often, they agree on very little. But that doesn't mean the texts assembled here do not resonate with one another. Philosophers, economists, journalists and activists comment on past and present manifestations of Europe. Taken together, these essays are exercises in defamiliarisation. Sure, we don't fully understand what is going on. Then again, experts didn't fare too well either, as a quick glance at the pre-2008 forecasts of economists, the analyses of geopolitical pundits or the trajectories of the expert-led transitional governments in Europe's South reveals. That's why we have no desire to wallow in passivity and fatalism. On the contrary, creating a sense of distance between Europe and ourselves will perhaps enable us to relate to it in new ways. Ever since the postwar reconstruction, Europe vacillated between grand political designs and economic expediency. The introduction of the Euro in 2002 and the ongoing crisis of 2008 have accelerated a shift in the balance of power. Nation-states lost some of their prerogatives and now have to accommodate the demands of unelected supranational entities in charge of implementing the precepts of economic rationality. A sense of powerlessness has become widespread. It has given a new lease of life to nationalism and xenophobia across Europe. Young people in particular wonder what could possibly be the point of having democracy conform to markets if capitalism cannot even make good on its one spellbinding historical promise: to enable wealth creation for the masses through individual effort and hard work? As is stands in 2014, giving up democratic principles in order to purify the operations of the markets seems like the surest way to the worst of both worlds: a technocratic caesarism. Economists tentatively hail Greece's return to the capital markets, they rejoice at the first signs of positive growth rates and welcome, give or take some accounting tricks, the sound budgets in member-states that are testament to the efficacy of the austerity measures. Meanwhile, unemployment in many parts of the EU remains stubbornly high. And let's not even talk about wage levels. Far from marking the end of history and the triumph of liberal market societies, 1989 could have turned out to be a Pyrrhic victory for capitalism, a possibility for which even François Furet allowed in his very last essays. Before its long overdue collapse, 'real existing socialism' - imperialist, authoritarian, unjust, inefficient, and downright depressing as it was - nonetheless inspired a fear among the governments of the so-called Western world that tamed capitalism in ways not seen before or after. Did bureaucratic state capitalism in the East protect the liberal capitalism of the West from what it wanted? Even when the latter seemed to be on excellent form after 1989, it often turned out to be pumped up on a diet of monetary steroids: soaring private and company debt sustained the boom times. Capitalism's hold over the planet is neither uniform nor exclusively imposed by force. It emerged out of a contingent history of the "universalisation of a tendency", as Deleuze and Guattari put it. However, a European left that has yet to come to terms with the full extent of its political insignificance seeks solace in the idea of an economic matrix that structures every fold of the social fabric: it is plausible, inescapable and terrifyingly good at harnessing even the forces of resistance to its own purposes. While the therapeutic aspect of this sort of thinking cannot be dismissed, its analytical virtues are more questionable. Still, as we survey the political landscape in 2014, no serious - and politically desirable - alternative exists. And yet liberal market societies struggle with ever more intense degrees of disaffection among their supposedly blessed populations. We observe the striking comeback of inequalities of wealth reminiscent of the Belle Époque. If current trends continue we could soon live in societies so unequal one would have to go back to the pre-industrial age to find anything comparable. This is certainly not a process of differentiation that is synonymous with modernity, as some commentators, grotesquely misinterpreting Luhmann, would have us believe. To reduce the potential of social differentiation to the acceptance of economic disparities betrays a poverty of thought that speaks volumes about the state of mind of a "brute bourgeoisie", itself a symptom of a deeply dysfunctional society. In Merkel-land, it found a new party-political home in the "Alternative for Germany". But opposition to the Euro also gains currency on the left. This is unsurprising given the intransigence of monetary hawks in the central banks and the institutional set-up of the Eurozone. Another Euro was possible, one that would have attempted to pave the way for an optimal currency area, rather than simply presupposing its existence.This would have required large-scale investments and significant redistributive efforts to harmonise - and raise - living standards in all of Europe. We need to unearth these counter-histories of the single European currency. As long as genuine political and social union is but a distant possibility, the imperative of price stability and the impossibility for individual Euro states to devalue their currency reduces the available range of political responses to economic distress to just one: the downward adjustment not just of economies but of entire welfare systems in order to restore competitiveness. However, there is no economic automatism here. These are deeply political decisions. As so often, economic liberalism knows very well when to portray itself as the arch-foe of oppressive states and undemocratic post-national institutions - and when to enlist their help in order to get its doctrinal way. Some conclude from this state of affairs that, provided it can be made politically productive, a break with the Euro regime should no longer be considered a taboo. Others are wary of reductive explanations that, for the sake of conceptual and political convenience, denounce the Eurozone as a monolithic neoliberal bloc. We stand to benefit a great deal from learning how to spot and exploit political divisions. Even inside the European Commission, there is room for forms of militant bureaucracy that deftly maneuver the legal labyrinthe (ranging from the 1953 European Convention on Social and Medical Assistance to the measures towards greater coordination of social security systems passed in 2004). Recent attempts to bully Merkel's government into potentially widening access to welfare payments for European citizens living in Germany lent credence to this claim. One day, these regulatory squabbles might bring us a minuscule step closer to a Europe-wide unconditional basic income. Let the robots do the crap jobs. Given the jingoistic mood of most electorates, even many leftist parties are taking leave from demands for postnational social rights that are legally enforceable. They fear such a move would be tantamount to political suicide. Nonetheless, the track record of European institutions and the general tendency of intergovernmental decisions taken during the last two decades or so suggest that it would be insane to rely on emancipatory political action from above. Yet the question of exactly how to reclaim Europe as a battleground from below is close to intractable. What effective form could a dialectic between "institutional and insurrectional" politics take? New forms of entryism might play a role, as those who support Alexis Tsipras' candidacy for the presidency of the European Commission argue. Mass pressure from the street would open a second flank. But even though they have been theorised for many years, European social movements worthy of their name continue to be conspicuous by their absence. Or should we push for individual states to give up their sovereignty and merge with their neighbour, thus creating political forms that mark an intermediate stage between the nation-state and and a European polity? It all sounds rather far-fetched. Interestingly, the recent protests in Bosnia oppose not just corrupt local elites, but also the institutions of the international community that purports to have pacified the remnants of former Yugoslavia. The revolution in the Ukraine that has courageously overthrown a deeply corrupt regime, on the other hand, did appeal to a EU that embodied hopes for a better political and economic life even as parts of the crowd openly displayed their neo-Nazi sympathies. We need to address the underlying identity issues haunting this continent as a whole and the individuals that inhabit it. It is impossible to overlook the signs of libidinal exhaustion. Europe has a problem with desire. The economic, political and social systems no longer produce pleasure. We're all tired but we haven't done nearly enough to explore and invent new lives. The family rushes in to fill this void. We grew accustomed too quickly to the omnipresence of "family-friendly" policies, by now a staple of European political language. We could have known better. In Anti-Oedipus, Deleuze and Guattari had warned us. As capitalism marches onward, all existing social relations will cede to its pull. But that's not the same as simple disappearance. Quite the opposite. The family was first emptied of all historical functions, only to be reinvented as a bulwark against some of the more troubling and pathological aspects of contemporary capitalism. It offers respite from the constant flexibility that is expected of us, it helps pool resources as welfare states are being dismantled, it pays lip service to feminist struggles by singing the praise of the care work done by stay-at-home mums. In France, reactionaries are marching through the streets in their thousands. Their opposition to same-sex marriage forms part of a wider struggle to combat the rampant "family-phobia" in today's societies. We want none of it. The hypocrisy is plain for everyone to see. There is significant overlap between the defenders of good old family values and the milieus in which shameless hostility to migrants has once again become acceptable. But some migrants are better than others. The latest version of the mother-father-family relies on cheap non-unionised female labour, the army of nannies recruited from abroad. These are some of the migrants that made it to Europe. Many others don't even get that far. The activities of Frontex seem blissfully oblivious to the very colonial past they incessantly conjure up. The same fervour that was at work in the historical project of European expansionism is now observable in the systematic efforts to stop migrants - to ensure successful "border management", as official parlance has it. Europeans used to invade foreign lands to enrich themselves, now they keep others out to protect their privileges. Images of drowned, starved or deported refugees don't prevent European politicians for a second from invoking 'our' grand cultural tradition, preferably while lecturing other parts of the world on the West's civilisational achievements: philosophy, human rights, dignity, you name it. Perhaps the treatment to which migrants are subjected has something to do with Europe's historical self-understanding after all. These corpses float in the same Mediterranean sailed by cunning Ulysses. They're dying to reach the shore they might have otherwise called home. This much is clear to us: as long as other people are treated like garbage in our name, we betray the potential of EURO TRASH. The costly insistence on rigid borders is not just a European problem. It's a cosmic one. Space is a place where quaint attempts to divide it up according to the time-worn logic of sovereignty must fail. As Donald Kessler has pointed out as early as 1978, the debris piling up in the orbit, if unchecked, will reach a point where space travel becomes too dangerous. And little does it matter whether the out-there is littered by NASA or ESA. We might be stuck on this planet at the precise moment when we'd be well advised to leave it behind. Borders have a funny way of shutting in the people they claim to protect. There were concerns about a possible lack of German voices in this collection but acid legend Carlos Souffront came to our rescue and his exclusive "Europe from Detroit" mix dispels them in the most unexpected, poignant and concise way possible. Kraftwerk's 1977 "Trans-Europe-Express" imagined the continent as a haven of post-historical nostalgia. We asked Carlos to reimagine Europe as a province of Detroit in order to invert the usual perspective. Often, the Motor City is an object of European musical desire, filled to the brim with projections even, and especially if there is post-industrial desolation to be admired. Let's try it the other way around. The mix expertly strides between delicacy and a sense of impending dread that culminates in a brief sequence where German history unmistakably rears its ugly head. But there is life beyond that, there has to be. This is not a mind trip, this is a body journey. WE'RE THE EDITORS, WE'RE SVENJA BROMBERG, BIRTHE MÜHLHOFF, AND DANILO SCHOLZ.

Sklep: Libristo.pl

Just Keep Breathing - 2826743088

68,07 zł

Just Keep Breathing Hugo House Publishers

Książki / Literatura obcojęzyczna

My husband has AIDS. I miraculously don't. How am I going to survive? ...I try to keep from screaming, "Dennis, you can't do this to me now. I left my family, my friends, my job, pulled the kids away from their school and friends-you can't quit on us. You can't." Through clenched teeth, he controls his response, "Scott, I'm tired. I'm dying." Dennis is walking away and does not sound tired; he sounds angry. "Have you not heard anything I've told you for the last twenty-three years? I love you; you are my life. Don't you dare think I'm not dying here, too. You may be the one who gets buried, but I'm the one who has to figure out how to keep living. I'm dying, Dennis; I'm dying with you." We stand there, energy spent, emotionally depleted, tears falling. I take him in my arms, and we hold on to each other as if we draw life's breath from the other-because we do. He sits on the sofa, and I go find the Dallas phone book so I can call Restland, the place where we will bury his body. When Joan Scott Curtis was 43 years old, she found out her husband was dying of AIDS. He had been infected for thirteen years. She tested negative. None of this was possible. It was the mid 1990s. All the prejudices about AIDS are not supposed to exist anymore, but they do. Just Keep Breathing is the remarkable story about finding courage in small victories, on taking solace in helping others, and knowing that even though the major battle will be lost, the ability to live on with grace and dignity is what defines the war. "An extraordinary journey told in a spiritually insightful way that will grip your heart and your emotions and cause you to take a step back and be grateful-that in some way, you...will know yourself a little better. Patti Machin Garrett, City Commissioner, Decatur, Georgia

Sklep: Libristo.pl

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